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I want to closely monitor the chain of function calls which are called from a certain function.

import pdb; pdb.set_trace()
res = api.InsertVideoEntry(video_entry, video)

I'm looking for a way to easily see that api.insertVideoEntry(video_entry, video) calls foo() which calls bar() which calls baz(),

Here's a really crude diagram to show what I mean. I don't need it in this form, but this is the kind kind of information I'm looking for.

api.insertVideoEntry()
    foo()
        bar()
            baz()
            baz2()
        log()
    finish()
share|improve this question
    
Also, I don't have time to test and write up a complete answer right now, but take a look at the inspect module. (In particular the functions for examining frames.) –  kojiro Jul 25 '12 at 19:01
    
@kojiro - Improved my acceptance rate, thanks for the reminder –  Stuart Powers Jul 25 '12 at 19:09
    
Are you interested in alternatives which do not use pdb? –  unutbu Jul 25 '12 at 19:32
    
Did my answer not work for you? –  Noctis Skytower Apr 15 '13 at 11:55
    
@NoctisSkytower, your answer is great, thank you. I would have accepted it sooner but I hadn't seen it. Thanks again :) –  Stuart Powers Apr 19 '13 at 6:25
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This was an interesting learning experience to write up. Maybe you can use the code shown here? This demonstration should give you an idea of the type of output you can expect when using trace.

# Functions to trace
# ==================

def baz():
    pass

def baz2():
    pass

def bar():
    baz()
    baz2()

def log():
    pass

def foo():
    bar()
    log()

def finish():
    pass

def insertVideoEntry():
    foo()
    finish()

# Names to trace
# ==============

names = list(locals())

# Machinery for tracing
# =====================

import os
import sys

def trace(start, *names):
    def tracefunc(frame, event, arg):
        if event == 'call':
            code = frame.f_code
            name = code.co_name
            if name in names:
                level = -start
                while frame:
                    frame = frame.f_back
                    level += 1
                print('{}{}.{}()'.format(
                    '    ' * level,
                    os.path.splitext(os.path.basename(code.co_filename))[0],
                    name))
                return tracefunc
    sys.settrace(tracefunc)

# Demonstration of tracing
# ========================

trace(2, *names)

insertVideoEntry()

If you are interested in a recursive demo, you might like this variation with a called arguments readout:

import os
import sys

def main(discs):
    a, b, c = list(range(discs, 0, -1)), [], []
    line = '-' * len(repr(a))
    print(a, b, c, sep='\n')
    for source, destination in towers_of_hanoi(discs, a, b, c):
        destination.append(source.pop())
        print(line, a, b, c, sep='\n')

def towers_of_hanoi(count, source, via, destination):
    if count > 0:
        count -= 1
        yield from towers_of_hanoi(count, source, destination, via)
        yield source, destination
        yield from towers_of_hanoi(count, via, source, destination)

def trace(start, *names):
    def tracefunc(frame, event, arg):
        if event == 'call':
            code = frame.f_code
            name = code.co_name
            if name in names:
                level = -start
                args = ', '.join(repr(frame.f_locals[name]) for name in
                                 code.co_varnames[:code.co_argcount])
                while frame:
                    frame = frame.f_back
                    level += 1
                print('{}{}.{}({})'.format(
                    ' ' * (level * 4),
                    os.path.splitext(os.path.basename(code.co_filename))[0],
                    name, args))
                return tracefunc
    sys.settrace(tracefunc)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    trace(3, 'main', 'towers_of_hanoi')
    main(3)
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer @NoctisSkytower! Follow up question though -- what about scenarios where I don't know ahead of time the functions that are going to be called? I originally wanted this so I could see the flow of control when calling a method of a GData object. The Youtube/GData modules aren't exactly light and I was looking for the easiest way to see which functions call which functions (so I could more easily hack a few changes which I needed to make). –  Stuart Powers Apr 19 '13 at 6:31
1  
@StuartPowers: You could probably replace the line of code if name in names: with if True: to see all of the calls being made. BTW, a new example has been added that allows you to see what arguments the function was called with. –  Noctis Skytower Apr 19 '13 at 14:43
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