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Possible Duplicate:
Where and why do I have to put the “template” and “typename” keywords?

recently a piece of code confused me:

class A {
 public:
  typedef int SomeType;

  void func(SomeType i);
  SomeType func2();
};

void A::func(SomeType i) {
  cout << "in A, value: " << i << endl;
}
SomeType A::func2() {
  return 123;
}

int main() {
  A a;
}

G++ 4.4 gives a compile error that it does not know the SomeType while compiling A::func2:

error: 'SomeType' does not name a type

But the same SomeType compiles well in A::func(SomeType i):

class A {
 public:
  typedef int SomeType;

  void func(SomeType i);
};

void A::func(SomeType i) {
  cout << "in A, value: " << i << endl;
}

Anyone can help me to understand this? It seems C++ treats unfair to argument types and return types?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Xeo, tereško, j0k, ρяσѕρєя K, John Conde Jul 26 '12 at 20:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
@Xeo: typename/template keywords are only needed for names dependent on template parameters. There's no templates here. – interjay Jul 25 '12 at 19:04
    
Using A::SomeType instead of SomeType outside of the class declaration fixes it. ideone.com/1VZdy – Wug Jul 25 '12 at 19:08
    
@interjay: Right, nvm. Dealing so much with templates lately, that it just didn't occur that this is not one. :s – Xeo Jul 25 '12 at 19:08
    
Thanks for your comments. I think what confused me most is the first function compiles well but it also uses unqualified SomeType as parameter... – Kai Jul 25 '12 at 19:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

gcc is right -

/* can't use unqualified name */  A:: /* can use unqualified name */  () {
}

Before the A::, you need to qualify the nested type with A::. So you need:

A::SomeType A::func2() {  
   //whatever
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I can understand this might be necessary, but what confused me is why the argument type does not need A:: – Kai Jul 25 '12 at 22:40
    
@Kai it's just how the language works. After you qualify the definition with A::func2, you're already in the name scope of the class. Not that much to it. You shouldn't waste too much time on this. It's how the language is designed, pure and simple. – Luchian Grigore Jul 25 '12 at 22:47

You need to change

SomeType A::func2() {

to

A::SomeType A::func2() {

The reason that this differs from func1() is that SomeType is used in the parameter list there so that the compiler knows that it can look in class A for the type. However, with func2(), SomeType is the return type and the compiler doesn't know to look in class A yet.

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Simply change the definition of func2 to:

A::SomeType A::func2() {
    return 123;
}

You need to tell the compiler you want to use the SomeType typename defined inside class A.

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Instead, use this Qualify SomeType with the class name as in

  A::SomeType A::func2() {
      (...)
  }

SomeType cannot be used outside the A class and func2 is visible outside the A class This URL - states the following in the C++ specification

http://balbir.blogspot.com/2005/06/scope-of-typedefs-in-class-in-c.html

In particular, type names defined within a class definition cannot be used outside their class without qualification.

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