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Is there a simpler way to access the member function GetJ() in the Derived class, other than the one chosen in the second std::cout below ?

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

class Base
{
    int i;

    public:

    Base(int k) : i(k) {}
    int GetI() { return i; }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
    int j;

    public:
    Derived(int u) : Base(10) { j = u; }
    int GetJ() { return j; }    
};

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<Base> uptr(new Derived(5));
    std::cout << uptr->GetI() << std::endl;
    std::cout << static_cast<Derived*>(uptr.get())->GetJ() << std::endl;
}
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1  
By the way, a simple static_cast works just as fine. –  chris Jul 25 '12 at 19:26
    
@chris: That is, as long as you definitly know that the base pointer points to that specific derived class. –  Xeo Jul 25 '12 at 19:28
    
@Xeo, Yes, but even if you don't, reinterpret_cast isn't your best choice. –  chris Jul 25 '12 at 19:29
    
@chris: OMG, I read that as dynamic_cast... oh my. –  Xeo Jul 25 '12 at 19:30
    
@chris Thanks for your suggestion. I've edited the code. –  user1162978 Jul 25 '12 at 19:36
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2 Answers

To the previous version of question:

First of all, reinterpret_cast is definitely wrong way to do this. Just try this:

struct A
{
    char x[10]; 
    A():x{9}{}

};

class Derived : public A, public Base
{
// your code here   
};

instead of your Derived definition.

static_cast works fine here.

To the current state:

But usually when you are going to use Derived functionality by pointer to Base class, you want virtual function:

class Base
{
    //....
    virtual int GetJ() const = 0;
    // or virtual int GetJ() const { return -1;} if Base should be created itself.

    virtual ~Base(){} //oh, and don't forget virtual destructor!
};

class Derived: public Base
{
    //...
    virtual int GetJ() const { return j; }
}
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From your example, it looks like you could do with a pure virtual function in the base class. –  chris Jul 25 '12 at 19:42
    
@chris, I also thought about it. I'm not sure if Base should be used itself... –  Lol4t0 Jul 25 '12 at 19:44
    
@chris It works with GetJ() as a pure virtual function in Base, i.e., if I replace the 2nd std::cout with std::cout << uptr->GetJ() << std:;endl; I get 5 printed ! If you submit an answer I will accept it. –  user1162978 Jul 25 '12 at 19:49
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I believe GetI and GetJ belongs to two different classes although Derived is derived from Base. Now the question relies how to access this.

Derived* p = new Derived(5));
std::cout << p->GetI() << std::endl;
std::cout << p->GetJ() << std::endl;

The above code should work well because you've derived from the places.

But if you really wanted to work with

Derived* p = new Derived(5));
Base* pBase  = p;
std::cout << pBase->GetI() << std::endl;
std::cout << p->GetJ() << std::endl;

The above approaches are just because the functions are not virtual. But if you declare the functions as virtual you really don't have to bother about upcasting and downcasting. the base pointer itself is sufficient to work for you

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