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I got a class Foo having a method doSomething that uses two class-related variables b and c that are expensive to get/create. My first version looks like this:

public class Foo {

    private final A a;

    public Foo(A a) {
        this.a = a;
    }

    public void doSomething() {
        final B b = a.getB();
        final C c = b.getC();

        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            // do something with b and c
        }
    }
}

So I get the first object (type B) via a class variable a and the second object (type C) via the first object.

Now, since those variables are related to the class and the method is always called exactly one time (though not necessarily when creating an object of type Foo), I thought about making them class variables as well:

public class Foo {

    private final A a;
    private final B b;
    private final C c;

    public Foo(A a) {
        this.a = a;
        b = a.getB();
        c = b.getC();
    }

    public void doSomething() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            // do something with b and c
        }
    }
}

I'm not sure which version to use if any of those two. I somehow don't feel comfortable making those two variables class members since they can be retrieved from the existing class variable a. However, it would increase readability of the methods IMO.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are absolutely right. If it increases readability, bu all means do it. However, I would ask you this: What is the purpose of Referencing A from within the class? Is it only for getting B and C? In this case, I would just input B and C in Foo's constructor!

This way you even make it more readable by breaking the dependency on A and Making the dependency on B and C more explicit.

Also, consider whether you are using these variables in other methods in the class. If the answer is yes- it signals that they should be class members, However, if the class contains a lot of methods that do not use these variables, that might signal the opposite.

The general principle you should follow here is the principle of High Cohesion

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I made the snippet too simple → unfortunately there's no way for me to get rid of the class variable a, but there's really just this method in the class, so basically all methods are using these variables. :P –  htorque Jul 25 '12 at 21:01
    
In this case I would ask myself why is this piece of code segregated into a separate class in the first place? Can it be that it can simply be a method in the class that actually uses this logic? –  Vitaliy Jul 25 '12 at 21:11
    
There are two reasons why it's not a method in another class: 1. together with similar methods it would clutter up that class (read: doSomething is big enough for its own class), 2. it's called from an abstraction layer - so I actually want to hide the implementation. From the two upvoted answers I conclude: use the local variables as class members, but only if they are strongly related to the class and if they significantly enhance readability. So again one of those questions where there is no pragmatic answer? :-) –  htorque Jul 26 '12 at 3:36
1  
@htorque Why this is your pragmatic answer :-) This is one of those questions that deal with grey and fuzzy areas that don't have a black or white answer, just rule of thumbs and guidelines that different people interpret differently.. –  Vitaliy Jul 26 '12 at 7:36

generally speaking, if you can use a local variable, it is preferable to using a field.

Using a local variable

  • limits the variable to where it is used.
  • uses less memory.
  • is thread safe.
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Why not just store instances of B and C in your class Foo? Do you reference A somewhere in your class? Otherwise, Storing both B and C as instance variables is no less memory efficient, since storing one A object contains a B and C object.

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From my experience static (or class variable|field|method) usually became evil after some time and needs to be refactorred out except cases when this stuff is static by it's nature (Math.PI or Math.max() are examples or such static things). If those methods are doing some computation based on anything dynamic I would leave them as instance.

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