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In Java's String.class, I see this

public String substring(int beginIndex, int endIndex){
   //if statements
   return ((beginIndex == 0) && (endIndex == count)) ? this:
     new String (offset + beginIndex, endIndex - beginIndex, value);
}

What is the '?' doing? While we're on the subject, can anyone explain whats happening with that 'new String' in the return statement? Is that some kind of conditional?

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1  
It's an inline if expression, condition ? if true : if false devdaily.com/java/edu/pj/pj010018 –  asawyer Jul 25 '12 at 19:38
    
    
downvote? care to explain? –  Daniel Jul 25 '12 at 19:46
    
It is probably from a thought of "too little research" as I imagine this is a somewhat commonly asked question. All the same, I don't think it is deserved, your English was clear (and you are relatively new, +1) –  BlackVegetable Jul 25 '12 at 19:47
    
I did research it. "java using ?", "java return ?", "java using the character ?", etc, I get nothing. I had no idea what a ternary operator was so I couldn't search for that –  Daniel Jul 25 '12 at 19:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's a ternary operator and it is equivalent to:

if((beginIndex == 0) && (endIndex == count)) {
  return this;
} else { 
  return new String (offset + beginIndex, endIndex - beginIndex, value);
}
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This is a ternary operator.

Cake mysteryCake = isChocolate() ? new Cake("Yummy Cake") : new Cake("Gross Cake"); 

Think of it as:

If this condition is true, assign the first value, otherwise, assign the second.

For a return statement, that becomes:

If this condition is true, then return the first thing, otherwise return the second.

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1  
Nice example :D –  Baz Jul 25 '12 at 19:42
    
Yeah, but it uses bad coding practice, as it is calling a static method for what should only be known after the Cake has been created! –  BlackVegetable Jul 25 '12 at 19:43
    
+1 for a real-world example ;-). BTW consider removing braces around isChocolate(), might look better –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jul 25 '12 at 19:43
    
Done; the braces around isChocolate() were a hold-over from my company's standards. –  BlackVegetable Jul 25 '12 at 19:44
    
Oh, just noticed: new Cake(isChocolate() ? "Yummy Cake", "Gross Cake") is IMHO more readable (if ternary is ever readable ;-)). –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jul 25 '12 at 20:40
return boolValue ? a : b;

will return a if boolValue is true and b otherwise. It's a short form of if else.

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return ((beginIndex == 0) && (endIndex == count)) ? this:
 new String (offset + beginIndex, endIndex - beginIndex, value);

is the same of:

if ((beginIndex == 0) && (endIndex == count)) 
    return this;
else 
    return new String (offset + beginIndex, endIndex - beginIndex, value);
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The ?: is the ternary operator: a ? b : c is equivalent to:

if (a) then b; else c;

can anyone explain whats happening with that 'new String' in the return statement

The ternary operator is the conditional in this return statement, but new String is no sort of conditional, it is simply constructing a new String: depending on the conditional, this return statement returns either:

  • this, or
  • a new String object
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It is a Ternary Operator, used in many programming languages no just Java. It is quite useful to put everything in a single line basically it equals this:

if (endIndex == count && beginIndex == 0)
{
    return this;
}
else
{
   return new String (offset + beginIndex, endIndex - beginIndex, value);
}

New String is just a constructor.

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