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Python newbie here. I am writing a program to count how many times a substring is a string, but keep receiving the error message: TypeError: a is undefined. I have looked at /googled similar threads but the code is usually convoluted and hard to follow.

Here is my code:

def stringcount(char, word):
for eachChar in word:
    if char==eachChar:
        count=count+1
        return count
    print count

stringcount('a', 'apple')

Thanks a lot!

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3  
In case you don't know you can also call the function count on string, e.g. 'apple'.count('a') –  jmetz Jul 25 '12 at 19:41
    
Your return statement is going to short circuit your function... also, is your indentation correct here? –  Silas Ray Jul 25 '12 at 19:42
    
@sr2222 is right - and your indentation is messed up. –  jmetz Jul 25 '12 at 19:42
    
...and count isn't initialized! –  jmetz Jul 25 '12 at 19:44
    
This is not the code you are using. It cannot produce the error you describe. However, this code uses count before assigning it a value, so you'll get UnboundLocalError. –  Francis Avila Jul 25 '12 at 19:44

3 Answers 3

def stringcount(c, word):
    count = 0
    for eachChar in word:
        if c==eachChar:
            count=count+1

    return count

>>> stringcount('a', 'apple')
1
>>>

But in this case you can simply use:

>>> 'apple'.count('a')
1
share|improve this answer

This code is dangerous. You aren't initializing count, so if count exists as a variable in the namespace you could get a different result every time. For example, if you call the function multiple times, count will not reset and the second time the function is called it will return 2. The following code is much safer and works.

def stringcount(char, word):
    count = 0
    for eachChar in word:
        if char==eachChar:
            count += 1
    return count

>>> stringcount('a', 'apple')
1

Also note that you can simply do 'apple'.count('a') to do the same thing.

A nice one-liner does the same thing:

def stringcount(char, word):
    return sum(x==char for x in word)
>>> stringcount('p', 'apple')
2
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for emphasizing the need to initialize count within the function namespace. –  Lenna Jul 25 '12 at 19:47

If you aren't writing this for a programming exercise, you could do:

def stringcount(c, word):
    return word.count(c)

print stringcount("a", "apple")

Docs: http://docs.python.org/library/string.html#string.count

share|improve this answer
    
Why define a function at all? The OP can just call 'apple'.count('a'). –  jmetz Jul 25 '12 at 19:48
    
@mutzmatron: Clearly, but I'm following the functional syntax of the OP. –  Lenna Jul 25 '12 at 19:49
    
I see what you mean, though I agree with @sr2222 in the sense that if this is some kind of assignment the OP probably has to define their own full function, and otherwise no function is required at all. I don't really see a point in the halfway answer?... but then who knows! –  jmetz Jul 25 '12 at 19:51
1  
I also forgot about string.count(). Anyway, some people may be more comfortable with functional syntax than object oriented syntax. Never mind Zen 12 :) –  Lenna Jul 25 '12 at 19:57

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