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I've been trying to find a way of sorting this with standard commandline tools, bash, awk, sort, whatever but can't find a way apart from using perl or similar.

Any hint?

Input data

header1
3
2
5
1

header2
5
1
3
.....
.....

Output data

header1
1
2
3
5

header2
1
....

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assumes sections are separated by blank lines and the header doesn't necessarily contain the string "header". Leaves the sections in the original order so the sort is stable. Reads from stdin, displays on stdout.

#!/bin/bash

function read_section() {
    while read LINE && [ "$LINE" ]; do echo "$LINE"; done
}

function sort_section() {
    read HEADER && (echo "$HEADER"; sort; echo)
}

while read_section | sort_section; do :; done

Or as a one-liner:

cat test.txt | while (while read LINE && [ "$LINE" ]; do echo "$LINE"; done) | (read HEADER && (echo "$HEADER"; sort; echo)); do :; done
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That is really neat! –  Mark Jul 22 '09 at 16:21
    
the "cat" can be omitted. # while ...... do :; done < file –  ghostdog74 Jul 23 '09 at 0:17
    
Damn, I knew somebody'd throw me a "Useless Use of Cat Award" for that. –  John Kugelman Jul 23 '09 at 0:19

Try this:

mark@ubuntu:~$ cat /tmp/test.txt
header1
3
2
5
1

header2
5
1
3
mark@ubuntu:~$ cat /tmp/test.txt | awk '/header/ {colname=$1; next} {print colname, "," , $0}'  | sort | awk '{if ($1 != header) {header = $1; print header} print $3}'
header1

1
2
3
5
header2
1
3
5

To get rid of the blank lines, I guess you can add a "| grep -v '^$'" at the end...

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Use AWK to prefix the header to each number line.
sort the resulting file.
remove the prefix to return the file to original format.

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hmm, can you elaborate that? note that those headers are not necessarily ordered, the sort should be stable. –  Arkaitz Jimenez Jul 22 '09 at 14:48
    
@Arkaitz, Mark has given an example of what I was saying. +1 to him for working that out (and maybe -1 to you for not trying?, ok, i am kidding there). –  nik Jul 22 '09 at 15:18

with GNU awk, you can use its internal sort functions.

awk 'BEGIN{ RS=""}
{
    print $1
    for(i=2;i<=NF;i++){
        a[i]=$i
    }
    b=asort(a,d)
    for(i=1;i<=b;i++){    
        print d[i]
    }
    delete d
    delete a    
} ' file

output

# more file
header1
3
2
5
1

header2
5
1
3
# ./test.sh
header1
1
2
3
5
header2
1
3
5
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