Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I keep seeing people using doubles in C#. I know I read somewhere that doubles sometimes lose precision. My question is when should a use a double and when should I use a decimal type? Which type is suitable for money computations? (ie. greater than $100 million)

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by nawfal, George Duckett, CloudyMarble, Jeff Tratner, nvoigt Jun 3 '13 at 4:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Do you want fractions of cents? (like at gas stations) –  Daniel F. Thornton Jul 22 '09 at 14:39
    
    
There's actually a fairly answer: decimal works like a long and an int (it's an integral type!), but it has a dot somewhere in its syntax and output format (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integer_(computer_science) ). Double and float work with a mantissa and an exponent (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floating_point ). That's it. –  Stefan de Bruijn Apr 4 at 9:24
add comment

7 Answers 7

up vote 440 down vote accepted

For money, always decimal. It's why it was created.

If numbers must add up correctly or balance, use decimal. This includes any financial storage or calculations, scores, or other numbers that people might do by hand.

If the exact value of numbers is not important, use double for speed. This includes graphics, physics or other physical sciences computations where there is already a "number of significant digits".

share|improve this answer
12  
It's not that double is inaccurate - it has relative accuracy and can represent very large or small magnitudes that decimal cannot handle at all. –  Michael Borgwardt Jul 22 '09 at 15:14
19  
Here's why you use Decimal for money: Double's accuracy is only 16 decimal digits, and after just a few arithmetic ops, errors will quickly accumulate large enough to creep into the 15, 14, 13, etc. digits. Rounding to "cents" requires at least one digit of full accuracy after cents digit, but really you should reserve 4 or 5 to insulate from cumulative arithmetic errors, which you CANNOT allow to corrupt the hundredths column you use to round the cents. That leaves you with 16 (total) - 2 (cents) - (4 or 5 error padding) = oh $hit only 7 (or less) reliable integer digits for your money! –  Triynko Mar 21 '12 at 22:01
4  
As a result, I wouldn't manipulate monetary values of more than $9.99 (1 integer digit), because rather than 4 or 5 digits of error accumulation padding, I'd want more like 10 or 11. Since Decimal is a 128-bit number, it gives you that kind of isolation, even with numbers in the hundreds of trillions of dollars, because it has 28-29 digits of accuracy. However, you can't go much higher than that. 999,999,999,999,999.99R (999 trillion) would require 18 digits of accuracy to round properly, and since decimal gives you 28-29, that's only 10 digits of cumulative arithmetic error insulation. –  Triynko Mar 21 '12 at 22:15
14  
Just to rub it in... if you were building a game, would you really care if the barrel of explosives you just catapulted a quarter mile across a field lands a 1/16 of an inch off target because of the cumulative errors over the hundreds of "position + (velocity * time)" steps? I doubt it. –  Triynko Mar 21 '12 at 22:21
4  
To clear this up double does not have 16 digits - that is only the number of meaningful digits. Floats are based around exponents in base 2 math - some base 10 numbers are corrupted because they are an infinite series if converted to a base 2 exp, in binary float math 0.1 * 0.1 != 0.01 because 0.1 cannot be represented exactly. Math operations also lead to drift - add and subtract with dollars and cents and you can get numbers like 0.9999999999999. toString() initially hides this through rounding, but exact comparisons are broken immediately. –  David Mar 27 '12 at 12:36
show 3 more comments

My question is when should a use a double and when should I use a decimal type?

decimal for when you work with values in the range of 10^(+/-28) and where you have expectations about the behaviour based on base 10 representations - basically money.

double for when you need relative accuracy (i.e. losing precision in the trailing digits on large values is not a problem) across wildly different magnitudes - double covers more than 10^(+/-300). Scientific calculations are the best example here.

which type is suitable for money computations?

decimal, decimal, decimal

Accept no substitutes.

The most important factor is that double, being implemented as a binary fraction, cannot accurately represent many decimal fractions (like 0.1) at all and its overall number of digits is smaller since it is 64-bit wide vs. 128-bit for decimal. Finally, financial applications often have to follow specific rounding modes (sometimes mandated by law). decimal supports these; double does not.

share|improve this answer
1  
There is no doubt that double is not to be used when representing financial values, but what did you exactly mean when you wrote that double does not support specific rounding modes, compared to a decimal? AFAIK, Math.Round has overloads which accept the MidpointRounding parameter for both double and decimal? –  Groo Sep 28 '11 at 12:12
    
@Groo: I guess I must have looked at the .Net 1.1 API, the method was added in 2.0 - but it's still kinda pointless due to the problems with binary fractions. There's an example in the current API doc that illustrates this problem. –  Michael Borgwardt Sep 28 '11 at 13:27
add comment

Decimal is for exact values. Double is for approximate values.

USD: $12,345.67 USD (Decimal)
CAD: $13,617.27 (Decimal)
Exchange Rate: 1.102932 (Double)
share|improve this answer
3  
Decimal is not for exact values. Decimal provides 28-29 decimal digits of accuracy according to the documentation. Decimal does not perform analytical arithmetic and is therefore not "exact". Decimal is great for money, because even with values in the trillions of dollars, it still leaves you with 10 digits of insulation from cumulative arithmetic error, while still being able to accurately round to cents. –  Triynko Mar 21 '12 at 22:24
    
Why is the exchange rate double and not decimal? Isn't that also simply the price of 1 USD in CAD? –  gerrit Nov 19 '12 at 17:28
2  
@gerrit An exchange rate is not the "price" of 1 USD in CAD. It is the ratio of the value of the two. Depending on your source determines how many decimal places you'll be given. For example, 1 USD is worth 1.0016 CAD. 1 Great Britian Pound is worth 1.5909 CAD. 1 Vietnamese Dong is worth 0.000048 CAD. It's a ratio as such cannot realistically be truncated anywhere without losing precision. –  Ian Boyd Nov 19 '12 at 18:33
1  
@gerrit The 0.000048 is from the Bank of Canada. XE says one VND is worth 0.0000478405 Canadian. They are calculated as a division; which results in a floating point value. –  Ian Boyd Nov 19 '12 at 18:41
add comment

For money: decimal. It costs a little more memory, but doesn't have rounding troubles like double sometimes has.

share|improve this answer
add comment

System.Single / float - 7 digits
System.Double / double - 15-16 digits
System.Decimal / decimal - 28-29 significant digits

The way I've been stung by using the wrong type a good few years ago is with large amounts:

  • £520,532.52 - 7 digits
  • £1,323,523.12 - 8 digits

You run out at 1 million for a float.

A 15 digit monetary value:

  • £1,234,567,890,123.45

9 trillion with a double. But with division and comparisons it's more complicated (I'm definitely no expert in floating point and irrational numbers - see Marc's point). Mixing decimals and doubles causes issues:

A mathematical or comparison operation that uses a floating-point number might not yield the same result if a decimal number is used because the floating-point number might not exactly approximate the decimal number.

When should I use double instead of decimal? has some similar and more in depth answers.

Using double instead of decimal for monetary applications is a micro-optimization - that's the simplest way I look at it.

share|improve this answer
    
520,532.52 has 8 significant number and 1,323,523.12 has 9 mathsfirst.massey.ac.nz/Algebra/Decimals/SigFig.htm –  Royi Namir Apr 6 at 14:32
add comment

Definitely use integer types for your money computations. This cannot be emphasized enough, since at first glance it might seem that a floating point type is adequate.

Here an example in python code:

>>> amount = float(100.00) # one hundred dollars
>>> print amount
100.0
>>> new_amount = amount + 1
>>> print new_amount
101.0
>>> print new_amount - amount
>>> 1.0

looks pretty normal.

Now try this again with 10^20 Zimbabwe dollars

>>> amount = float(1e20)
>>> print amount
1e+20
>>> new_amount = amount + 1
>>> print new_amount
1e+20
>>> print new_amount-amount
0.0

As you can see, the dollar disappeared.

If you use the integer type, it works fine:

>>> amount = int(1e20)
>>> print amount
100000000000000000000
>>> new_amount = amount + 1
>>> print new_amount
100000000000000000001
>>> print new_amount - amount
1
share|improve this answer
3  
You don't even need very large/small values to find differences between doubles base2 approximation and actual base 10 values, many small values cannot be accurately stored. Calculate "1 - 0.1 - 0.9" (make sure the compiler doesn't optimize out the equation), and compare it to zero. You'll find that with doubles the result is something like 2e-17 instead of 0 (make sure you run a compare, as many print/ToString functions round off doubles past a certain number of decimal places to remove these types of errors). –  David Jul 22 '09 at 15:39
add comment

I think that the main difference beside bit width is that decimal has exponent base 10 and double has 2

http://software-product-development.blogspot.com/2008/07/net-double-vs-decimal.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.