Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

this code seems to work under Windows (with unexpected results) and Ubuntu. But when I run it under FreeBSD 9.0 AMD 64 it causes the system to freeze. I get error messages like this:
ahcich0: Timeout on slot 28 port 0
Does anybody know what the problem could be?
Thanks.

#include <cmath>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    const string FILENAME = "testfile";
    const string COPYNAME = "copy";
    const int FILES = 5;
    const int SIZE_MULTIPLIER = 6;
    const int BUFFER_SIZE = pow(2.0, 16);

    time_t times[2][FILES];

    srand (time(NULL));

    // create test files
    for (int i = 1; i < FILES + 1; i++){
        ofstream os;
        string filename(FILENAME);
        filename += (char)i + 48;
        os.open(filename.c_str(), ios::binary);
        if (os.is_open()){
            cout << "Writing file " << i << " of " << FILES;
            long filesize =pow(2.0, i * SIZE_MULTIPLIER);
            cout << " (" << filesize << " bytes)" <<  endl;

            while(filesize--){
                os << (char)(rand() % 256);
            }
            cout << os.tellp() << " bytes written.\n";
            os.close();
        }else{
            cerr << "Could not create file " << filename;
            cerr << endl;
        }
    }

    // copy the files
    timeval tv;
    time_t start;
    char buffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
    char ci;
    for (int i = 0; i < FILES; i++){
        ci = (char)i + 49;
        string filename(FILENAME);
        filename += ci;
        string copyname("c");
        copyname += COPYNAME;
        copyname += ci;

        cout << "Copying file " << filename.c_str() << endl;

        cout << "the c way: "; 
        cout.flush();

        start = time(NULL);

        FILE *pFile = fopen(filename.c_str(), "rb");
        FILE *pCopy = fopen(copyname.c_str(), "wb");
        if (!(pFile == NULL || pCopy == NULL)){
            do{
                int bytesRead = fread(
                    buffer, 1, BUFFER_SIZE, pFile);

                fwrite(buffer, 1, bytesRead, pCopy);
            }while(!feof(pFile));
            fclose(pFile);
            fclose(pCopy);

            cout << " Done.\n";
        }else{
            cerr << "Could not open either " << filename;
            cerr << " or " << copyname << endl;
        }

        times[0][i] = time(NULL) - start;
        remove(copyname.c_str());

        copyname = "cpp";
        copyname += COPYNAME;
        copyname += ci;

        cout << "the c++ way: ";
        cout.flush();

        start = time(NULL);

        ifstream in;
        in.open(filename.c_str(), ios::binary);
        in.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(buffer, BUFFER_SIZE);
        ofstream out;
        out.open(copyname.c_str(), ios::binary);
        char copyBuffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
        out.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(copyBuffer, BUFFER_SIZE);

        if (in.is_open() && out.is_open()){
            out << in.rdbuf();
            in.close();
            out.close();
            cout << " Done.\n";
        }else{
            cerr << "Could not open either " << filename;
            cerr << " or " << copyname << endl;
        }

        times[1][i] = time(NULL) - start ;
        remove(copyname.c_str());
    }

    cout << "Summary:\n";
    cout << "\tc\tc++\n";
    for (int i = 0; i < FILES; i++){
        ci = (char)i + 49;
        cout << "copy" << ci << "\t" << times[0][i];
        cout << "\t" << times[1][i] << endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
In short, your hardware is broken (or the OS is not configured correctly to work with it). This is not a programming problem. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 25 '12 at 20:14
    
Have you looked into what dmesg says? How about df -h? Enough disk space? –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jul 25 '12 at 20:15
    
Yeah, probably FreeBSD has trouble working with your hardware, if in Windows/Linux it works properly (I assume we're talking about the same machine). –  Unknown Jul 25 '12 at 20:16
    
thanks for your answers. I still hope, the hardware is not broken. What could I ask dmesg? And yes, it's the same machine. Edit: There's enough disk space left –  Stefan Berger Jul 25 '12 at 20:17
    
What does "with unexpected results" mean in the context of Windows? –  Kevin Vermeer Jul 25 '12 at 20:18

2 Answers 2

After changing FILES to 4 (because it takes very long otherwise), your program ran just fine here:

Writing file 1 of 4 (64 bytes)
64 bytes written.
Writing file 2 of 4 (4096 bytes)
4096 bytes written.
Writing file 3 of 4 (262144 bytes)
262144 bytes written.
Writing file 4 of 4 (16777216 bytes)
16777216 bytes written.
Copying file testfile1
the c way:  Done.
the c++ way:  Done.
Copying file testfile2
the c way:  Done.
the c++ way:  Done.
Copying file testfile3
the c way:  Done.
the c++ way:  Done.
Copying file testfile4
the c way:  Done.
the c++ way:  Done.
Summary:
        c       c++
copy1   0       0
copy2   0       0
copy3   0       0
copy4   0       0

(FreeBSD 9.0-RELEASE-p3 amd64, compiled with clang++)

share|improve this answer

There could've been a bug in the achi-driver in 9.0, that showed up under heavy load. Or, it could've been a buggy controller, that was failing under the same load -- and not failing under other OSes, because they weren't taxing it as much.

Is this still a problem with FreeBSD 9.2?

As for your program, you ought to check not just for feof(), but also for ferror() in your read/write loop. Further, in my opinion, such read/write loops are a thing from the past. These days, when size_t and offset_t are of the same width (64-bit platforms), you ought to simply mmap() your source file and fwrite it into destination in one go. Look, ma, no loop!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.