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Qt 4.8.2, windows 7 x64 (But I should be thinking about this as a generic implementation, not OS dependant -if possible-)

This is a conceptual question and also about implementation.

I have a (Very) simple QApplication. It reads an XML with "button" tags, for each "button", add a new QPushButton to the layout. This allows me to dynamically generate a gui based on a config file (The XML). My issue is taking it to the "next level".

I want to start associating those buttons with other modules (for example: QDialog), which would then do whatever it is they have to do.

My final objective is to have an application that "reads a configuration file" (xml) and based on its info, it generates as many buttons as modules were read. After that, "connect" the buttons "launch commands" (I don't have a better wording for it right now) which would run as a normal module would... until you close it, then you would return to the menu.

I basically want to have a menu that is dynamically generated (by reading the XML file) and then connects those buttons to execute/start my modules. I also want it to be flexible, so if tomorrow I add a new module to my XML and the module into the app folder, I want it to be able to launch it.

My questions are:

1) Was I clear enough?

2) How do games normally go about executing processes? For example; A "Menu" from a videogame (in most AAAs) is usually made in Action Script or something similar, and then, when you select "new game" or "load game", etc, it executes certain other Modules (for lack of a better word), particularly the transition between the New Game button and loading the DirectX application and stuff.

3) How would one go about developing such projects? Should I make multiple projects inside a common solution?

As you can see, I don't have that much knowledge about software design, so if you think my questions are too basic and you have some book you'd suggest I am willing to read on the subject, I do admit I am more than a bit lost and any sort of advice is welcome.

As always, if I am not clear enough or I can expand on something, do let me know. I appreciate any and all kinds of help on this topic.

Also: if anybody thinks I should change the current tags, tell me so. I figured those were the most appropiate.

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"internal process" Why does it need to be an internal process? Wouldn't it be easier to run it as a regular process and just wait for it to finish? –  Nicol Bolas Jul 25 '12 at 21:18
    
Would you please elaborate? Actually, I don't know if it would be (or if it wouldn't), hence why I am asking. I said "internal process" because I sincerely thought it would imply it would be a "module from the application" instead of a stand alone app executed from my main app. –  Alejandro Matias Ravasio Jul 25 '12 at 21:25
    
That's my question: what's wrong with running it as a stand-alone app? People do this all the time: write little launcher programs for frequently used tools. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 25 '12 at 21:32
    
Hmmm, my only "requirement" would be that people is not able to just go to the folder and execute those stand alone games. I want them to "have to" use the menu. –  Alejandro Matias Ravasio Jul 25 '12 at 21:36
    
Why is it that important to run it from the menu? You're making a lot of work for yourself for something that is, at its foundation, very simple: an app launcher. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 25 '12 at 22:11

2 Answers 2

You probably don't need to visualize this as an "application within an application". When you break it down, what it really is, is an application that can launch processes, and is configured via xml files.

After that, "connect" the buttons to DLLs? other .exe files? which would run as a normal application.

I am not sure what you mean specifically, when you say connecting to DLLs... But all this really needs to do is launch a subprocess from your app. If I click button A, then it can launch Application A in a QProcess. Your app is the parent process and knows when it will stop running.

If what you mean when you refer to DLLs is that you want to develop other widgets compiled separately, and be able to dynamically load them in from a button click, then I would think it is still not another application. You only have one QApplication running at a time. If you import new modules containing widgets, they can be shown running under the same existing event loop.

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>When you break it down, what it really is, is an application that can launch processes, and is configured via xml files. Are you sure? I mean, now I see that my description might be off, but I don't see how >If what you mean when you refer to DLLs is that you want to develop other widgets compiled separately and be able to dynamically load them in from a button click Yes, I mean exactly that. I am reading the QProcess documentation right now. Isn't QProcess made to execute "external" applications? (i.e. Firefox, Calc, Notepad, etc) won't the overhead would be big if that's the case. –  Alejandro Matias Ravasio Jul 25 '12 at 20:55
    
Then yes, I think the description isn't clear in your question because you referred to .exe's, which led me to believe you wanted to launch applications. Yes QProcess is for launch external processes. No it wouldn't be much overhead because its a separate process and you aren't really communicating with it other than launching it. As for creating widgets in external libraries, there really isn't anything stopping you from loading them in and running them within the same QApplication. –  jdi Jul 25 '12 at 21:01
    
Ok, I'll edit my original question. I said it like that because I did not know how to properly refer to what I wanted to do. How would you go around loading widgets in external libraries? Remember I don't know how those things are called (As in class names) because I want them to be dynamically generated. I think I will add this example, too; I have a main app that's a menu. I want it to launch different games I will make (all as a package, not stand alone apps) and generate said menu based on what games I installed. –  Alejandro Matias Ravasio Jul 25 '12 at 21:10
    
Well I don't know much about compiling logic code for these games on the fly, but it sounds more like you simply want to do what Qt Designer already does. It generates the UI you design in XML and then uic can load it into an actual widget object. –  jdi Jul 25 '12 at 21:12

How do games normally go about executing processes? For example; A "Menu" from a videogame (in most AAAs) is usually made in Action Script or something similar, and then, when you select "new game" or "load game", etc, it executes certain other Modules (for lack of a better word), particularly the transition between the New Game button and loading the DirectX application and stuff.

This is incorrect.

"most AAAs" are a single application. Whether they use Action Script or any particular scripting language to build their GUI is irrelevant. The game is usually a single application; you're always in the game. It always has DirectX or OpenGL or whatever running, whether you're in gameplay or sitting at a menu screen. When you start a game, all that happens is that the game runs a series of functions within the application.

They are not necessarily arranged in "modules" or some other construct that the outside world can access or even knows about. They do not usually "load" other code; it's simply calling other functions in an application.

At it's core, it's no different than a command-line application that waits for the user to type some input, then does something with that input.

"most AAA" games cannot do what you're asking. You can't just add something to an XML file and have them load another game within the current one. They aren't built that way, and that's not their purpose.

If you want to have a flexible menu application that launches other games, then each game must be a separate application, and the menu app should be separate from all of them. At which point, launching a game is just launching a process. This is how Steam and similar tools work.

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