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I have the following, however I'm unable to access the database functions outside of the initial db class?

Thanks!

database.php

class db
{
  private $connection;

  public function __construct()
  {
    $this->connection = new PDO();
  }
}

admin.php

class admin
{
  private $connection

  public function __construct(db $connection)
  {
    $this->connection = $connection;
  }

  function myFunc()
  {
    // How do I access the connection here?
  }
}

main.php

//include db.php
//include admin.php

$connection = new db();
$admin = new admin($connection);

// How do I access the DB here?
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all, why are you encapsulating PDO just to class containing that one object? Cannot you use PDO directly?

One of the common practices would be to implement getter in db class, like:

class db {
    ...

    public function getPDO(){
       return $this->connection;
    }
}

Another way is to re-implement every function (why would you do that?!), or use __call magic function...

Or just make $connection public ;)

Or you could extend PDO class (I'm not sure whether it'll work):

class DB extends PDO {
    public function __construct ( $dsn, $username = null, $password = null, $driver_options = array()){
            parent::__construct( $dsn, $username, $password, $driver_options);
            ... more of your stuff
    }

    public function myFunc(){
        $this->...
    }
}
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Thanks for you reply. The db class contains several functions not shown here, so is best off as a class. It was suggested to me that the PDO object be created when the class was instantiated, to avoid having to use $object->getPDO()->Prepare(); every time. This is a big project, so i'm trying to avoid public variables. Could you perhaps shed some light on why my example is not working about however? Thanks! –  Craig Wilson Jul 25 '12 at 21:22
    
@CraigWilson take a look at edit, if this will work it should solve all your problems at once –  Vyktor Jul 25 '12 at 21:30
    
Have implemented a getter method getPDO(), separate from __construct, then passed this into the constructor for the worker class. Thanks. –  Craig Wilson Jul 27 '12 at 13:53
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ok, you really need to go and read up on object-oriented design, and access modifiers. I'll explain what you need to do here, but this is a band-aid solution, and you need to deeply understand how things are working here.

In your admin class, you defined the connection as a private attribute of the class. So in the myFunc function, you simply do $this->connection to access the connection that you created in the constructor.

In your main.php file, the object you are getting rom initializing a DB object is not the connection. It is the db object as a whole, so you can not pass the connection by itself to the admin class (it is defined as private, so nobody outside the class can view it). However, why do you need to pass it to the admin class? Managing the DB connection should be the responsibility of the DB class.

In other words, what are you trying to achieve by exposing the DB connection to the admin class?

Upate: based on the reply here is a suggested answer:

class Database {
    private $connection;
    public function __construct() {
        $this->connection = new PDO();
    }
}

class Admin {
    private $db;
    public function __construct() {
        $this->db = new Database();
    }

    public function myFunc() {
        $this->db->query('...');
    }
}

In your main.php file:

$admin = new Admin();
$admin->myFunc();

Keep in mind, every admin object is going to create a new connection to the DB, so if you create many admin objects you might face some issues. You can get around this by declaring the DB to be a singleton.

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Thanks for the reply. Here's a link to my post from a few weeks ago, where this design pattern was suggested to me. stackoverflow.com/questions/11508070/… –  Craig Wilson Jul 25 '12 at 21:12
    
check the updated answer for info –  Faisal Jul 25 '12 at 21:31
    
Thanks. I think this was why it was suggested to me to inject the db object into the Admin from the main.php file? Do you have any ideas why my current example will not work? –  Craig Wilson Jul 25 '12 at 21:36
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How about this:Updated

 <pre>
 <?php 
class DB {

    private $host;
    private $user;
    private $pass;
    private $dbase;
    private $connection;

    public function __construct($host,$user,$pass,$dbase)
    {
        $this->host = $host;
        $this->user = $user;
        $this->pass = $pass;
        $this->dbase = $dbase;
        $this->connection = new PDO("mysql:host=$this->host;dbname=$this->dbase", $this->user, $this->pass);
    }
    public function connect()
    {
        return $this->connection;
    }
    public function close()
    {
        unset($this->connection);
        return true;
    }
}
$dbh = new DB('localhost','root','','inventory');
$result  = $dbh->connect()->query("SELECT * FROM products")->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
print_r($result);
?>
</pre>
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Thanks for your reply. Where do I define $connection? –  Craig Wilson Jul 25 '12 at 21:24
    
The connection is defined inside the contruct method after the variables have encapsulated. –  Johndave Decano Jul 25 '12 at 21:29
    
Thanks, but should $connection; not be defined as private first? –  Craig Wilson Jul 25 '12 at 21:32
    
I just edited it. You can use method chaining to make the transaction straight forward., –  Johndave Decano Jul 25 '12 at 22:19
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Updated with files separation

database.php

class db
{
    private $connection;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->connection = new PDO();
    }
}

admin.php

class admin
{
    private $connection

    public function __construct(db $connection)
    {
        $this->connection = $connection;
    }

    function myFunc()
    {
        return $this->connection->prepare('SQL');
    }

    function getConnection()
    {
        return $this->connection;
    }
}

main.php

require_once 'database.php';
require_once 'admin.php';

$connection = new db();
$admin = new admin($connection);
$admin->myFunc()->execute();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Could you perhaps demonstrate how this would work across files, as in my above example? Thanks! –  Craig Wilson Jul 25 '12 at 21:22
    
Thanks for your reply. Unfortunately this gives me a Fatal error: Call to undefined method db::prepare() when called via $this->connection->prepare from within the admin class? Any ideas? –  Craig Wilson Jul 26 '12 at 14:03
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