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I have several questions regarding to class loaders.



NotYetLoadedClass cls = new NotYetLoadedClass();

What class loaders will be used in each case? For the first case I assume class loader that was used to load class in which method code is executing. And in the second case I assume thread context class loader.

In case I am wrong, a small explanation is appreciated.

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See… for the first case (your assumption is correct). See also this question for a good explanation. – DNA Jul 25 '12 at 21:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both use the current ClassLoader. As DNA correctly points out, states that Class.forName() uses the current class loader. A little experiment shows that a class loaded for instantiation using the new statement also uses the current ClassLoader:

public class Test
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
        Thread.currentThread().setContextClassLoader(new MyClassLoader());
        SomeClass someClass = new SomeClass();

    public static class MyClassLoader extends ClassLoader
        public MyClassLoader()

        public MyClassLoader(ClassLoader parent)

public class SomeClass
    public void printClassLoader()

In Test we set the current's thread ContextClassLoader to some custom ClassLoader and then instantiate an object of class SomeClass. In SomeClass we print out the current thread's ContextClassLoader and the ClassLoader that loaded this object's class. The result is


indicating that the current ClassLoader (sun.misc.Launcher.AppClassLoader) was used to load the class.

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What do you mean by "the current ClassLoader"? – jameshfisher Aug 26 '14 at 14:29
@jameshfisher "the defining class loader of the current class" – Uli Sep 2 '14 at 7:50
What do you mean by "the current class"? Lexical scope? – jameshfisher Sep 2 '14 at 8:31

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