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I have several UserControls that are sharing some common properties. Example:

private List<MyObject> Sample
        {
            get
            {
                return Session["MyObject"] as List<MyObject>;
            }
            set
            {
                Session["MyObject"] = value;
            }
        }

I want to share this to all user controls inside my project. (Not to other projects in a solution, of course). What I'm trying to do is create a separate class and inherit from that class. Something like:

public class SampleBase : Web.UI.UserControl
{
 protected List<MyObject> Sample
            {
                get
                {
                    return Session["MyObject"] as List<MyObject>;
                }
                set
                {
                    Session["MyObject"] = value;
                }
            }
}

And then my control can inherit those values by deriving from that class:

partial class myControl : SampleBase 

One problem I encounter is that I cannot derive from base if control already has something inherited:

partial class myControl : SomethingELSE

Otherwise it works fine, but I'm not sure if it is a good approach and I'm looking for suggestions.

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4 Answers 4

If my understanding is correct, you only want to get rid of the inheritance hierarchy of your User Controls

Another approach would be using Extension Methods

For example:

Interface to mark your USerControls

public interface IMyUserControlMark { }

Extensions

public static class MyUserClassExtensions
{
    public static List<object> GetSampleData(this IMyUserControlMark myUserControl)
    {
        if (HttpContext.Current.Session["MyObject"] == null)
        {
            return Enumerable.Empty<object>().ToList();
        }

        return HttpContext.Current.Session["MyObject"] as List<object>;
    }

    public static void SetSampleData(this IMyUserControlMark myUserControl, List<object> myObject)
    {
        HttpContext.Current.Session["MyObject"] = myObject;
    }
}

User control

public partial class Content1 : System.Web.UI.UserControl, IMyUserControlMark
{
     ...
}

public partial class Content2 : System.Web.UI.UserControl, IMyUserControlMark
{
     ....
}

Now you will be able to call your extension methods from within your UserControl or from the ASPX code behind like this:

From the UserControl

var myObject = this.GetSampleData();
this.SetSampleData(myObject);

From the ASPX code behind

var myObject = this.uc1.GetSampleData();
this.uc1.SetSampleData(myObject);
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1  
Agree - the best choice, because from what I see all that you need is convenience access to Session[] variables. This could be either a static class with static methods or an extension if you love them. –  achitaka-san Jul 31 '12 at 19:18
    
By using the extension methods approach as you exposed, you are implementing the interface in the interface. Is that even allowed in C#? I never tried it but I think it goes against software design principles about what is an interface, right? Correct me if I'm wrong please. Thanks. –  Fabian Fernandez Aug 2 '12 at 1:38
    
I think your confusion is to understand what an Interface is and what the user interface means. An interface is used basically to provide polymorphism. In this case you are using it to mark the UserControl's you'd like to use to provide the extension methods. In fact almost all controls in the .Net framework implement interfaces, for example, the System.Web.UI.UserControl class implements: IAttributeAccessor, INamingContainer, IUserControlDesignerAccessor and inherits from: TemplateControl. About the Ext met, the best practices is to extend interfaces instead of concrete classes –  Jupaol Aug 2 '12 at 2:05
1  
You don't have to use the Interface to mark your controls although it's a good practice... but you can _extend the user controls by themselves, just change the extension method declaration from: GetSampleData(this IMyUserControlMark to GetSampleData(this UserControl. This will cause that absolutely all UserControl's will contain the extension methods –  Jupaol Aug 2 '12 at 2:08
1  
@Fabian Fernandez the last part of Jupaol's comment is still the key. Extension methods are usually implemented on interfaces as a way to add broad functionality without worrying about multiple inheritance. Microsoft's first major extension library (LINQ to Objects) demonstrates this by extending IEnumerable everywhere. –  Tim Copenhaver Aug 6 '12 at 16:06

This is a classic example where you need to "favor composition over inheritance".

Instead of inheriting from the class, you hold a reference to an instance of the class. Then you provide simple pass-through code to access the methods/properties of the class.

So, for your example:

public class SomeBehavior
{
    public List<MyObject> Sample
    {
        get { return Session["MyObject"] as List<MyObject>; }
        set { Session["MyObject"] = value; }
    }
}

public class MyControl : UserControl
{
    private SomeBehavior _someBehavior;

    public MyControl()
    {
        _someBehavior = new SomeBehavior();
    }

    public List<MyObject> Sample
    {
        get { return _someBehavior.Sample; }
        set { _someBehavior.Sample = value; }
    }   
}

Another option is to allow access to the behavior class directly:

public class MyControl : UserControl
{
    public SomeBehavior SomeBehavior { get; private set; }

    public MyControl()
    {
        SomeBehavior = new SomeBehavior();
    }
}

The advantage of this is that you don't have to write the pass-through code. The disadvantage is that it violates the Law of Demeter, which says that you should "only talk to your immediate friends". If you do it this way, other classes that use MyControl need to know about SomeBehavior. Following the Law Of Demeter can improve maintainability and adaptability of your code, but it comes at a cost of lots of pass-through code.

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Is it possible to do it without creating new instance of SomeBehavior? I want to access the same exact values. –  user194076 Jul 25 '12 at 22:38
    
Yes, but it could be a little bit tricky because it appears you only want to share the data between classes within the same Session. If you use a unique instance for each class, it should still be getting the same info assuming you always get/set the values from the Session object. –  devuxer Jul 25 '12 at 22:42

Apart from previous solutions, maybe it's time for applying some MVC/MVP pattern? For web forms there is a great framework called WebFormsMVP: link In the library there is a mechanism called Cross Presenter Messaging thanks to which you can share a data between your controls using the publish/subscribe pattern. For better explanation look here and here

I suggest to give the library a chance :)

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In C# you can inherit from only one class and implement multiple interfaces.

This is allowed:

partial class myControl : SampleBase

partial class myControl : SampleBase, Interface1

partial class myControl : SampleBase, Interface1, Interface2, Interface3

This is NOT allowed:

partial class myControl : SomethingELSE, SampleBase

Try making SomethingELSE inherit from SampleBase if it satisfies your design. If not, then I suggest encapsulating SampleBase as a property of each control that needs it as it also suggested @DanM.

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