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error C2071: 'Lexicon::list' : illegal storage class

I have a class that reads a bunch of strings into memory and then provides functions that allow applying operations on those strings and their relationships. As part of this I'd like to have a shared memory between the main.cpp where some of the operations are initiated and the class where the operations are completed. For this, in a previous post, it was suggested to use an extern type. But, now there is an error. How do I resolve this error and have a memory space shared by several classes?

in lexicon.h

    #ifndef _lexicon_h
    #define _lexicon_h

    #include <string>
    #include <vector>

    using namespace std;

    class Lexicon {
    public:
    Lexicon();
    ~Lexicon();

    extern vector<vector<string>> list;

    void buildVectorFromFile(string filename, vector<vector<string>> &list, int v, int h);

    private:
    struct charT { char letter; nodeT *next;};
    };
    #endif

in main.cpp

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

#include "lexicon.h"  

void buildVectorFromFileHelper (Lexicon & lex)
    {
        vector<vector<string>> list;
        lex.buildVectorFromFile("ASCII.csv", list, 200, 2); //build 2x200 vector list
    }
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2 Answers

Ok, I missunderstood your previous question (this is what happens when you don't post full code). Inside a class, extern is not used:

in lexicon.h

#ifndef _lexicon_h
#define _lexicon_h

#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Lexicon {
public:
Lexicon();
~Lexicon();

vector<vector<string>> list;

private:
struct charT { char letter; nodeT *next;};
};
#endif 

in main.cpp

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <fstream>
#include <vector>

#include "lexicon.h"  

void buildVectorFromFileHelper (Lexicon & lex)
{
    vector<vector<string>> list;
    lex.buildVectorFromFile("ASCII.csv", list, 200, 2); //build 2x200 vector list
}

The problem here is that Lexicon doesn't have the method buildVectorFromFile, so how are you calling lex.buildVectorFromFile("ASCII.csv", list, 200, 2);?

To share the same vector, if it's a member, make it static:

class Lexicon {
public:
Lexicon();
~Lexicon();

static vector<vector<string>> list;

private:
struct charT { char letter; nodeT *next;};
};

In lexicon.cpp:

vector<vector<string>>  Lexicon::list;
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I edited for a simplified example and forgot to keep buildVectorFromFile() –  forest.peterson Jul 25 '12 at 22:13
    
@Luchian_Grigore, changed from extern to static and now have a LNK2001 unresolved external symbol –  forest.peterson Jul 25 '12 at 22:25
    
@forest.peterson right, forgot about that. See last line of answer. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 25 '12 at 22:36
    
@Luchian_Grigore found it! and it compiles, see answer - I tried the Lexicon::list but that was not allowing access to the memory. –  forest.peterson Jul 25 '12 at 22:50
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The rules of an extern memory is explained here in this daniweb thread; the comment there is that yes, this should be simple but it is somehow not intuitive. The gist is that the memory is globally declared with the extern prefix in .cpp file A and then to reuse the memory in cpp B, globally declare it again in .cpp file B.

I think Luchian_Grigore and @jahhaj were getting there but we had either just not found the words for me to understand or they were still finding the words to explain.

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You got it wrong. "The gist is that the memory is globally declared with the extern prefix in a .cpp file and then to reuse the memory, globally declare it again in that .cpp file." - you can declare it anywhere with extern. It's usually in a header because you can include that header in multiple places, but it can be anywhere. The second encounter in the cpp file is a definition. Totally different. This can be in only one place. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 25 '12 at 22:52
    
there was a typo, I edited the answer - I could not get the extern memory to work from the header, though this seems like the logical approach. It works how I answered. –  forest.peterson Aug 2 '12 at 23:24
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