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Given that I have got this HTML code:

<div>
    <h2>What is Lorem Ipsum?</h2>
    <p>Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry.</p>
    <a href="#">Read more</a>
</div>

And CSS:

div {
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: column;
    padding: 1em;
    border: 1px solid #DDD;
    border-radius: 10px;
}

div h2 {
    font-size: 1.2307em;
    text-align: center;
}

div p {
    flex: 1;
    margin: 0.7692em 0;
}

How can I style the anchor so that it is horizontally centred?

share|improve this question
    
I guess div { text-align: center; } p { text-align: left; } would do it. – thirtydot Jul 25 '12 at 22:34
    
@thirtydot, your guess was spot on, please post it as an answer. – Eliran Malka Jul 25 '12 at 23:02
    
@EliranM.: I'm not so sure it was. I don't think any browser actually supports plain display: flex as is in your demo; a vendor prefix of some sort is required. – thirtydot Jul 25 '12 at 23:54
    
@thirtydot, I am aware of your solution but I'm looking for something that implements the flex alignment concept. – katranci Jul 26 '12 at 9:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Set align-self: center on the <a> (with browser-specific versions of the property too, of course). Inline elements do indeed become flex items, so no need for a block-level wrapper around <a>.

That being said, if you're going to be using flexbox, you'll quickly discover that it often requires extra wrapping divs, so you may as well get used to that now. As long as you don't go crazy with them, this isn't a bad thing. The HTML5 spec even talks about how using divs for presentational purposes is appropriate. So don't feel too guilty about it when you just gotta add one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. By the time I wrote the question align-self wasn't covering the inline-level elements but the spec has changed since and now it is covering them. Here is a working demo: plnkr.co/edit/tRQA1u – katranci Aug 9 '13 at 20:52

one way is this:

  1. make your anchor a block element (display:block)
  2. give it a width (ie. 80px) and margin auto
  3. and finaly give it a width to the container (ie. 100%)

here is the css

     div {
        display: flex;
        flex-direction: column;
        padding: 1em;
        border: 1px solid #DDD;
        border-radius: 10px;
        width:100%;
    }

    div h2 {
        font-size: 1.2307em;
        text-align: center;
    }

    div p {
        flex: 1;
        margin: 0.7692em 0;
    }

    div a{
        width:80px;
        margin:auto;
        display: block;
    }

and the html

     <div>
         <h2>What is Lorem Ipsum?</h2>
         <p>Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry.</p>
         <a href="#">Read more</a>
    </div>
share|improve this answer
    
Could you improve your solution without using a fixed width? – katranci Jul 26 '12 at 9:38
    
Sure! in my code remove all the widths and add "text-align: center" to the anchor (the <a> tag). the key here is to make the anchor a block element (display:block) – Gaddiel Sadoc Peralta Jul 26 '12 at 14:30
    
Thanks but that will turn the whole line a click-able area which is not what I am looking for. I was hoping to see a solution that is implemented by using the flex layout module. – katranci Jul 26 '12 at 20:05

Having an anchor floating like that outside of a paragraph is not good markup. You should put a second paragraph tag around the anchor, and then center that paragraph.

You can also just use this CSS on your code as you have it now:

a {
text-align: center;
display: block;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do you think every inline-level element should be wrapped with a block-level element like p? – katranci Jul 26 '12 at 9:42
    
Yes, I think this is a good guideline. It will help your layout have solid structure and help your design principles as you're working out what goes where, and takes up what sort of space. – zenkaty Jul 30 '12 at 3:03
    
I like using just enough mark-up necessary to define the content semantically and style it. Introducing purely layout related tags can easily lead you to divitis. Also if you are working on a modular HTML code where it is presented differently then the layout tags become redundant. So for example if I needed to display an anchor on the right hand side I would float it to the right. – katranci Aug 5 '12 at 19:49

I found out that the "align-self" flex property helps to align an element in cross-axis. But it can only be applied to flex items and inline-level elements like <a>, <span>, etc. are not regarded as flex items. So the only solution that I can think of is wrapping it with a block-level element like <div> or <p> and using "text-align" property.

<div><a href="#">Read more</a></div>

div a { text-align: center; }

http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-flexbox/#align-self

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