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I have an array of elements where the entries are sparse. How can I easily condense the sparse array into a dense array so that I don't have to keep checking for null and undefined values every time I loop through the data?

Here is some example data:

var sparse = [];
sparse[1] = undefined;
sparse[5] = 3;
sparse[10] = null;

var dense = sparseToDenseArray(sparse);
// dense should be [3]
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why would dense be [3] instead of [undefined, 3, null]? 1 in sparse === true but 0 in sparse === false, so only the ones where you didn’t set values are really missing. if you want to do that, the answer is var dense = []; sparse.forEach(function(e) { dense.push(e) }), as this only loops over the existing items –  flying sheep Mar 11 at 12:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In vanilla JS, works on all browsers:

function filt(a) { 
 var b = []; 
 for(var i = 0;i < a.length;i++) { 
  if (a[i] !== undefined && a[i] != null) { 
   b.push(a[i]); 
  }
 } 
 return b; 
}

> filt([1,undefined,3])
[1, 3]
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You can use filter() which is compatible with Firefox, Chrome, IE 9, Opera, and Safari web browsers.

According to David Flanagan, in Javascript: The Definitive Guide, an easy way of transforming a sparse array to a dense array is to use a filter on it like so:

var dense = sparse.filter(function (x) { return x !== undefined && x != null; });

This works since filter() skips missing elements and only returns true if x is not undefined or null.

If filter() is not supported, this will compact a sparse array:

var compacted = [];

for(var i = 0; i < sparse.length; i++)
    if(i in sparse)
        compacted.push(sparse[i]);

An exact equivalent of the filter() example is:

var compacted = [];

for(var i = 0; i < sparse.length; i++)
    if(sparse[i] != null)
        compacted.push(sparse[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
No, those last two code snippets are not equivalent. The in operator checks whether a property exists whereas equality operators (==, !=, ===, !==) can tell you nothing about that. –  Tim Down Jul 25 '12 at 23:28
    
Your second code snippet will not do what the OP is after, in fact: it will give you [undefined, 3, null] for the array in the question. –  Tim Down Jul 25 '12 at 23:29
    
@TimDown I think you are refering to Charmander's first code snippet. –  Ivan Jul 25 '12 at 23:30
    
@TimDown: I appear to have worded that ambiguously and I apologize. By "the above" I meant the original filter() example. I will correct it immediately. –  Charmander Jul 25 '12 at 23:30
    
@Ivan: The second last one then. Depends whether you count the one-liner using filter. –  Tim Down Jul 25 '12 at 23:31

If you want to include underscore.js in your code, you can use the compact function on your array.

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filter is a JavaScript extension to the ECMA-262 standard; as such it may not be present in other implementations of the standard. You can work around this by inserting the following code at the beginning of your scripts, allowing use of filter in ECMA-262 implementations which do not natively support it. Reference : MDN.

A cross browser solution using filter

if (!Array.prototype.filter) {  // Add the filter method to the 'Array prototype' if it's not available
    Array.prototype.filter = function(fun /*, thisp*/) {
        var len = this.length >>> 0;
        if (typeof fun != "function") {
            throw new TypeError();
        }

        var res = [];
        var thisp = arguments[1]; 
        for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
            if (i in this) {
                var val = this[i];
                if (fun.call(thisp, val, i, this)) {
                    res.push(val);
                }
            }
        }
        return res;
    };
}

var sparse = [];
sparse[1] = undefined;
sparse[5] = 3;
sparse[10] = null;

dense=sparse.filter(function(a){ //Call the `filter` method
    return a!== undefined && a != null;
});

DEMO.

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