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How do you pythonically set multiple properties without referencing them individually? Below is my solution.

class Some_Class(object):

    def __init__(self):
        def init_property1(value): self.prop1 = value
        def init_property2(value): self.prop2 = value

        self.func_list = [init_property1, init_property2]

    @property
    def prop1(self):
        return 'hey im the first property'

    @prop1.setter
    def prop1(self, value):
        print value

    @property
    def prop2(self):
        return 'hey im the second property'

    @prop2.setter
    def prop2(self, value):
        print value


class Some_Other_Class(object):

    def __init__(self):

        myvalues = ['1 was set by a nested func','2 was set by a nested func']
        some_class= Some_Class()

        # now I simply set the properties without dealing with them individually
        # this assumes I know how they are ordered (in the list)
        # if necessary, I could use a map

        for idx, func in enumerate(some_class.func_list):
            func(myvalues[idx])

        some_class.prop1 = 'actually i want to change the first property later on'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    test = Some_Other_Class()

this became necessary to do when I had many many properties to initialize with user defined values. My code otherwise would look like a giant list of setting each property individually (very messy).

Note that many people have good answers below and I think I have reached a good solution. This is a re-edit mostly trying to clearly state the question. But, if anyone has a better approach please share!

share|improve this question
1  
You can't ensure read-only access for a class's variables in Python. You can only discourage access to those variables. –  Joel Cornett Jul 25 '12 at 23:34
    
What is self.setter1 doing? If you're in a class declaration then self won't be an instance of your class. Can you make it clearer where this code is and what self is in this context. –  Peter Graham Jul 25 '12 at 23:35
    
Also, you don't have any properties in your code. –  Peter Graham Jul 25 '12 at 23:37
2  
Your question still isn't really clear. What do you mean by "access these functions separately later on in the code"? Where in your example is "later"? Please post an example of what you want to do. –  BrenBarn Jul 26 '12 at 0:07
1  
-1 For having a question so garbled that you have complained about every answer. Take a look at: sscce.org and whathaveyoutried.com (useful, even though you have some code). –  Marcin Jul 26 '12 at 18:52

4 Answers 4

just use the @property decorator

>>> class A:
...    a=2
...    @property
...    def my_val(self,val=None):
...        if val == None:return self.a
...        self.a = val
...
>>> a=A()
>>> a.my_val
2
>>> a.my_val=7
>>> a.my_val
7

something like this?

if you only want to allow setting then dont give it a default val

>>> class A:
...    a=2
...    @property
...    def my_val(self,val):
...        self.a = val
...
>>> a=A()
>>> a.my_val
<Exception>
>>> a.my_val=7
>>> a.a
7

or if you only want to allow retrieval just ommit the 2nd arg

>>> class A:
...    a=2
...    @property
...    def my_val(self):
...        return self.a
...      
...
>>> a=A()
>>> a.my_val
2
>>> a.my_val=7
<Exception>
share|improve this answer
1  
In >= 2.6 - after @property ... def my_val ... you can then do @my_val.setter ... def my_val(self, val)... so you don't need the defaulted parameter and second arg in the first codeblock. –  Jon Clements Jul 25 '12 at 23:48
    
good addition ... I think i had used that before ... but usually the default arg is elegant enough for my purposes –  Joran Beasley Jul 25 '12 at 23:50
1  
The problem isn't how to implement properties for basic retrieval. Take your example: now I want to store "a" in a list, g, and then do g[index_of_a] = 5 and have it update the property. Unfortunately, given your approach the value of the property gets stored in the list - not the properties setter method. –  ecoe Jul 25 '12 at 23:54
    
ahh I kinda see what you are trying to do now... –  Joran Beasley Jul 26 '12 at 0:05
    
yes, and I cant answer my own question cause im a newbie... But I got it to work. Here is what I did: Create a small function that simply calls the property set method: def setprop1(value): self.prop = value. Now that function (and there is one for each property) can be referenced in a list. And if you make it a nested function inside of a function that sets all the properties you never have to see it again! If someone has a more elegant solution to that let me know! I will post my answer tomorrow (when I am able to). –  ecoe Jul 26 '12 at 0:09

I ... finally think I know what you're trying to do, and you don't need to do it the way you're approaching it. Let me take a stab at this.

class someclass(object):

    def __init__(self):
        func_list = [self.setter1, self.setter2]
        value_list = [1, 2]
        #    These lines don't need to be this complicated.
        #    for ind in range(len(func_list)): 
        #        func_list[ind](value_list[ind])

        for idx, func in enumerate(func_list):
            func(value_list[idx])

        #  Or even better
        for idx, (func, val) in enumerate(zip(func_list, value_list)):
            func(val)

    def setter1(self, value): 
        self.a = value

    def setter2(self, value): 
        self.b = value

It's worth pointing out that the idx variable and enumerate calls are superfluous in the second form, but I wasn't sure if you need that elsewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
close - but I am trying to use properties. see my answer –  ecoe Jul 26 '12 at 18:34
    
Thank you for the insight on enumeration though - part of your answer will be in mine! –  ecoe Jul 26 '12 at 18:41

If you look up the property in the object dict, you will get the property descriptor (if any), and likewise with the class; e.g.

a = SomeClass()
descriptor = a.__dict__.get('descriptor', type(a).__dict__.get('descriptor'))

Assuming that descriptor is a descriptor, it will have the following methods:

['deleter', 'fdel', 'fget', 'fset', 'getter', 'setter']

Note the fget and fset.

share|improve this answer
    
im sure this works but honestly code like this is way too hard on my brain. I plead ignorance! –  ecoe Jul 26 '12 at 0:11
    
What exactly is difficult for you about this? It has one function call nested inside another. –  Marcin Jul 26 '12 at 0:19
    
well, seeing how you could use this for accessing the property setter method would be nice. Otherwise it is not intuitive - see my answer below –  ecoe Jul 26 '12 at 18:35
    
@ecr I've added a list of the methods on descriptors in case you can't look that up. –  Marcin Jul 26 '12 at 18:47
    
I guess i am a "learn by example" kinda thinker. if you could implement a quick demo of this (setting the property from the list via iteration/enumeration like my answer) I would be sold on your superior method. –  ecoe Jul 26 '12 at 19:02
up vote -1 down vote accepted
class Some_Class(object):

    def __init__(self):
        def init_property1(value): self.prop1 = value
        def init_property2(value): self.prop2 = value

        self.func_list = [init_property1, init_property2]

    @property
    def prop1(self):
        return 'hey im the first property'

    @prop1.setter
    def prop1(self, value):
        print value

    @property
    def prop2(self):
        return 'hey im the second property'

    @prop2.setter
    def prop2(self, value):
        print value


class Some_Other_Class(object):

    def __init__(self):

        myvalues = ['1 was set by a nested func','2 was set by a nested func']
        some_class= Some_Class()

        # now I simply set the properties without dealing with them individually
        # this assumes I know how they are ordered (in the list)
        # if necessary, I could use a map

        for idx, func in enumerate(some_class.func_list):
            func(myvalues[idx])

        some_class.prop1 = 'actually i want to change the first property later on'

if __name__ == '__main__':
    test = Some_Other_Class()

In summary, this sets a bunch of properties without individually accessing them. Why is this helpful? Because what if you have a bunch of values that you just read from user input and rather than identifying each value as belonging to a certain property you were able to make the assumption that the index of the value corresponds to the index of the property? Now the issue is that either you access the property by if then statements (if index is this access that property) or just loop it and be done with it (my solution above). Why use properties? Because what if later on in the code you do want to access these class attributes later on and in a clean implementation such as with properties!

I greatly appreciate it if someone has a better idea for how to simplify the issue above. I am not writing code for the CIA so security is obviously not an issue. Quick development and easy readability are my two interests! I haven't selected an answer yet to see if someone can better my approach.

thanks to everyone for your comments. I think overall people were confused with what I was trying to accomplish. Please give feedback and I will update my Q/A with better explanation where you see it necessary.

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