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I have a file some what like this

Start ---abcxyz

End ---- efg123

Ref ----2345

Slack---- lmnop

..... ...... and the above format repeats with other things in between next the "Start & Slack"

i want to grep the line from the file for "Start" "End" "Slack" So how can we do in unix or using AWK.

-thanks

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You should accepting answers to your questions - see meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… for more information –  Ulrich Dangel Jul 26 '12 at 0:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as i understood your problem......you can try this

InputFile

Start ---abcxyz

End ---- efg123

Ref ----2345

Slack---- lmnop

Some other text

Some other text

Some other text

Start ---osdidiu

End ---- llll

Ref ----234513

Slack---- lmnodsasdp

Code

 awk '$1 == "Start" || $1 == "End" || $1 == "Slack----" {print $0}' InputFile

Output

Start ---abcxyz
End ---- efg123
Slack---- lmnop
Start ---osdidiu
End ---- llll
Slack---- lmnodsasdp
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I can read this question in two different ways, either echoing lines between two markers or just outputting multiple types of lines.


If you want the lines between Start and End (for example), you can use awk with an "echo" variable:

echo 'Start ---abcxyz
something goes here
and here
End ---- efg123
Ref ----2345
Slack---- lmnop' | awk '
    /^Start / { e = 1 }
              { if (e) { print } }
    /^End /   { e = 0 }
    '

Output is:

Start ---abcxyz
something goes here
and here
End ---- efg123

The echo variable e is initially unset so the if statement will never fire. Whenever awk sees a line beginning with Start, it will set the echo variable to true. In that case, all lines will be echoed from that point on.

Then, when awk sees a line beginning with End, it will set the echo flag back to false, preventing further output.

The order of the three awk commands can be used to decide whether the start and end lines are printed as well. For example, if you didn't want them, you could swap the first and third commands (the start and end ones):

echo 'Start ---abcxyz
something goes here
and here
End ---- efg123
Ref ----2345
Slack---- lmnop' | awk '
    /^End /   { e = 0 }
              { if (e) { print } }
    /^Start / { e = 1 }
    '

Output is:

something goes here
and here

If you just want the start, end and slack lines, grep is quite capabale of doing that:

echo 'Start ---abcxyz
something goes here
and here
End ---- efg123
Ref ----2345
Slack---- lmnop' | egrep '^Start |^End |^Slack'

Output is:

Start ---abcxyz
End ---- efg123
Slack---- lmnop
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