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I seem completely unable to solve this problem. When I run this loop:

for ( var i=0; i < 10; i++ ) {
    var $items = $(balls()); 
    console.log($items);
    $container.imagesLoaded(function(){
        $container.append( $items ).masonry( 'appended', $items, true );
    });
}

The first item, and the last item are fine, they look like:

<div class="box masonry-brick" id="resultBox" style="top: 0px; position: absolute; left: 0px; "><div><p>NAME</p><img src="pathtoimage.jpg"><boxbottom id="boxBottom">NUM%</boxbottom></div></div>

But the other 8 aren't fine, they look like:

<div class="box" id="resultBox""><div><p>NAME</p><img src="pathtoimage.jpg"><boxbottom id="boxBottom">NUM%</boxbottom></div></div>

So there's no 'masonry-brick' class being applied, which means they aren't getting processed by masonry.

Also relevant is:

function balls(){
    var boxes = [];
    $iterator -= 1;
    var box = document.createElement('div'),
        spacerdiv = document.createElement('div'),
        para = document.createElement('p'),
        img = document.createElement('img'),
        boxBottom = document.createElement('boxBottom'),
        name = document.createTextNode( $test[$iterator][1][2]['name'] ),
        percentage = document.createTextNode(Math.floor($test[$iterator][0]*100)+'%');

    box.className = 'box';
    box.id = 'resultBox';
    img.src= 'scripts/php/timthumb.php?src='+$test[$iterator][2]+'&q=100&w=300';
    boxBottom.id='boxBottom';

    box.appendChild( spacerdiv );
    spacerdiv.appendChild( para);
    para.appendChild(name);
    spacerdiv.appendChild( img );
    spacerdiv.appendChild(boxBottom);
    boxBottom.appendChild(percentage);
    // add box DOM node to array of new elements
    return box;
}

I think there's something odd going on with the DOM model here, perhaps because the elements are being created dynamically?
I've been at this all day, and I'm getting burned out...

share|improve this question
    
That looks kinda messy. Why not use jQuery all the way? –  elclanrs Jul 26 '12 at 0:50
    
...How? I'm sorry, unless I'm mistaken, is there a better way to do this? –  Adola Jul 26 '12 at 0:51
    
What sort of element is "boxBottom"? It doesn't seem to be a valid tag name. –  RobG Jul 26 '12 at 0:54
    
@Adola What I mean is if you use jQuery then use it. You'll save youreself many characters and it'll keep your code more organized. So instead of document.createElement('div') you can just do $('<div/>'), etc... –  elclanrs Jul 26 '12 at 0:57
    
Oh, I'm sorry, I think I completely misse dyour point. I was trying this out because of another issue I am having, i wanted to see if this would resolve something else. –  Adola Jul 26 '12 at 0:59
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I assume each invocation of .imagesLoaded() is binding your callback function to be run later, asynchronously, after images are in fact loaded. If so, you could change your code to something like this:

for ( var i=0; i < 10; i++ ) {
   (function() {
       var $items = $(balls()); 
       console.log($items);
       $container.imagesLoaded(function(){
           $container.append( $items ).masonry( 'appended', $items, true );
       });
   })();
}

...because JS doesn't have block scope, it has only function scope. So even though you placed the var statement inside the loop your $items variable isn't actually limited in scope to the loop and when the callbacks setup with .imagesLoaded() are executed they all reference the same $items - which will hold the value as at the end of the loop. By wrapping your code in a function (in this case an anonymous function expression that is immediately executed - note the () on the end) a new $items variable is created for every iteration of the loop and thus each of your .imagesLoaded() callbacks references the correct $items.

More efficient version (because it doesn't create a new function on each iteration):

function addBalls() {
   var $items = $(balls()); 
   console.log($items);
   $container.imagesLoaded(function(){
       $container.append( $items ).masonry( 'appended', $items, true );
   });
}
for ( var i=0; i < 10; i++ )
    addBalls();

Either way, if you actually need to reference the loop index i within the loop you'd just pass it as a parameter to the function.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh good lord, thank you so much. I had NO idea this was happening, I had an inkling from some testing, but i really didn't think this was the case. Thank you again. –  Adola Jul 26 '12 at 0:57
    
@Adola: Look here: desandro.github.com/imagesloaded –  Phpdna Jul 26 '12 at 22:29
    
Somesthing about that example I don't understand is where is $images ever defined? Or, how is the $images aggregated? –  Adola Jul 27 '12 at 0:01
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Very likely something strange is happening here:

boxBottom = document.createElement('boxBottom'), 

The argument for createElement should be a valid tag name.

share|improve this answer
    
I changed it, but it actually didn't make a difference it seems, left but left it as: boxBottom = document.createElement('div'), Been one of those days for me. –  Adola Jul 26 '12 at 1:16
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