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Sorry about the cranky title, here's the example:

<table>
  <tr>
    <th class="hey-1-aa"></th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <th class="hey-2-aa"></th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td class="hey-1-bb"></tr>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td class="hey-2-bb"></tr>
  </tr>
</table>

Is there any better way to selects all the THs/TRs start with the class prefix "hey-2-", with something less verbose than $('th[class^="hey-2"], td[class^="hey-2"]')?

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2  
$('.hey-2') .... ? –  Simon Whitehead Jul 26 '12 at 3:06
1  
Sorry for the seemingly dumb question, I've updated it a bit to mean what I really would like to know, sorry lol –  Kay Jul 26 '12 at 3:15
    
In essence, what I would like to know is that, if there is anything like (td, th)[class^="hey-2"] for selectors...? –  Kay Jul 26 '12 at 3:16
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could try this:

$('tr > [class^="hey-2"]')

That is, select any children of each tr element that have a class starting with "hey-2".

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/CCuxX/

(Or for markup exactly like that in the question: $('tr:odd > *'))

I know that obviously you've simplified your markup for the question, but as it stands you seem to be using classes as unique identifiers - if so you should use ids.

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Think this best suited something I was looking for, thanks! –  Kay Jul 27 '12 at 2:53
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$('.hey-2')

the selectors for sizzle (the jquery selector engine) begin with basic css and then move from there. so if you can style an element with a selector, you can grab it from jquery the same way.

for a list of selectors take a look at the jquery api

EDIT

so i would think the first thing to eliminate is limiting it to tr/th and just doing something like

$('table [class^=hey-2]')

that simplifies it quite a bit.

i tend to agree with the other answers though. if the items legitimately have something in common, why not give them a common class? instead of class="hey-2-aa" make it class="hey-2 aa" then you really can just use the original answer i posted.

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+1 for turning my comment into an answer :P –  Simon Whitehead Jul 26 '12 at 3:09
    
well, to be fair, if you had turned your comment into an answer i wouldn't have had to write this. ;) –  nathan gonzalez Jul 26 '12 at 3:10
    
Ah yes, indeed :) –  Simon Whitehead Jul 26 '12 at 3:11
    
Sorry for the seemingly dumb question, I've updated it a bit to mean what I really would like to know, sorry lol –  Kay Jul 26 '12 at 3:14
    
@Kay, sorry for the initial wrong answer. reading through the original question more carefully i can see my initial answer did not actually meet your need. –  nathan gonzalez Jul 26 '12 at 3:28
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Remember that you can use more than 1 class for an element. So, maybe it would be useful set more classes to the elements. It will be simpler to select.

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<table>
  <tr>
    <th class="hey-1-aa"></th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <th class="hey-2-aa sameclass"></th>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td class="hey-1-bb"></tr>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td class="hey-2-bb sameclass"></tr>
  </tr>
</table>

$(".sameclass");
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