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i am working on what should be a relatively simple java recursion problem, though i cannot seem to find a straightforward, one-method solution anywhere.

i am trying to print out asterisks in descending followed by ascending order, so that when the user passes in 3 for example, the print out will look like this:

*
**
***
**
*

EDIT: thanks to the help of @dasblinkenlight this has evolved to:

public void patternMaker(int start, int max, int direction){
    if(start == 0){
        return;
    }
    for(int i = 0; i < start; i++){
        System.out.print("*");
    }
    System.out.println();
    if(start == max){
        direction = -1;
    }
    patternMaker(start + direction, max, direction);

NOW, it prints the correct amount of asterisks, AND in the proper order:

*
**
***
**
*

thanks everyone for helping!

share|improve this question
    
Psssst, the answers have direction, but if you get stuck, or are just curious, I put a solution at ideone.com/StJRS :) – Ray Toal Jul 26 '12 at 4:35
    
@RayToal, appreciate the help, but i'm not sure he wants us using the Character wrapper class or importing any specific packages. – ohwutup Jul 26 '12 at 14:53
    
Indeed, that was just there for fun -- wink Glad you noticed! Use a loop, of course -- it is surely much faster and easier to understand than the one-line horror I threw in there. :) – Ray Toal Jul 26 '12 at 15:38
    
@raytoal thanks for the help anyways! always good to look at more code for practice. – ohwutup Jul 26 '12 at 16:25
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need another parameter to tell you which way you are going. You also need to test for the end condition to know when to switch from going up to going down.

public void patternMaker(int x, int direction){
    // Direction is either +1 or -1, depending on whether you go up or down
    // at the moment. Once you reach 3, switch the sign;
    // Once you reach zero, stop.

    // Pseudocode:
    // If x is zero, we're done
    // Print x asterisks followed by newline
    // if x == 3, make direction -1
    // Perform the recursive call with (x+direction, direction)
}

It would probably be easier to draw stars before recursing down, although both ways are certainly possible.

share|improve this answer
    
interesting, thanks for the reply! i am going to give this a shot and holler back. – ohwutup Jul 26 '12 at 4:19
    
so i am really liking this approach, although i can't seem to fully implement it. i now have it printing in both directions (still with one parameter), by using the loop before and after the recursive call, but it is printing opposite of how i want it. I'm not so sure how to use stackoverflow to show you my current code and print out again without posting another question, so i will shoot a link out here. – ohwutup Jul 26 '12 at 14:45
    
i just figured out i should just edit my original question, so the changes are above. thanks a lot! – ohwutup Jul 26 '12 at 14:52
1  
@ohwutup Take a look at the pseudocode from the edit. Here is a link to my implementation on ideone. – dasblinkenlight Jul 26 '12 at 15:10
    
awesome, the only issue is that i have to check if x equals its initial value not always 3, which can't be stored in a local variable right? i am going to try adding in a third parameter that will hold the same value and check x against it. – ohwutup Jul 26 '12 at 15:47

I'm not sure you can recurse with one parameter. I think you need two. Here's the idea:

stars(2, 4)

would print

**
***
****
***
**

and

stars(5, 6)

would print

*****
******
*****

This is naturally recursive. Why? Because

stars(n, n)

just prints n stars. That is the base case. Now how about the recursive step? Well let's try

stars(k, n)

where k < n. This is done like this

draw a line of k stars
call stars(k + 1, n)
draw a line of k stars

That is all. Of course a check that k < n is good to have, but we have faith that you can figure that out.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the response, i am sure that the recursion can be done with just one parameter, but i am not sure if i know how to implement that pseudocode at the end. – ohwutup Jul 26 '12 at 4:38
    
If you get it with one parameter let us all know. If you need help with the pseudocode at the end see my complete working Java solution at ideone.com/StJRS – Ray Toal Jul 26 '12 at 4:55
static String patternMaker(int x, String result){
    String curStr ="";
    for (int i=0; i<x; i++)
        curStr += "*";
    curStr += "\n";
    if (result == null){             
         return patternMaker(x-1,curStr);
    }else if (x > 0){           
          return patternMaker(x-1, curStr+result+curStr); 
    }
    else 
        return result;
}

//test with :
System.out.println(patternMaker(3,null));
share|improve this answer
    
this is the route i was looking to take from the beginning. testing now. thanks! – ohwutup Jul 26 '12 at 4:43
public class pattern {

public void patternMaker(int x){
    if(x > 0){
        for(int i = 0; i < x; i++){
            for(int j=0;j<=i;j++){
                System.out.print("*");
            }
            System.out.print("\n");
        }
        for(int i = x-1; i > 0; i--){
            for(int j=i;j>0;j--){
                System.out.print("*");
            }
            System.out.print("\n");
        }
    }
}
public static void main(String[] ar){
    new pattern().patternMaker(3);
}
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The question is about recursion... It seems you missed that part. – SiB Jul 26 '12 at 8:02

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