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Following-on from this question, is it possible to detect whether one is in design or runtime mode from within an object's constructor?

I realise that this may not be possible, and that I'll have to change what I want, but for now I'm interested in this specific question.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 87 down vote accepted

You can use the LicenceUsageMode enumeration in the System.ComponentModel namespace:

bool designMode = (LicenseManager.UsageMode == LicenseUsageMode.Designtime);
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That works nicely, thanks. –  nwahmaet Jul 22 '09 at 17:14
5  
Doesn't work in OnPaint. –  Filip Kunc Dec 23 '10 at 19:49
    
Elegant solution, it works better than C# functionality ISite.DesignMode. –  56ka Jan 15 at 13:02
1  
Does not work for the Compact Framework. –  Haymo Kutschbach Jan 21 at 14:41

Are you looking for something like this:

public static bool IsInDesignMode()
{
    if (Application.ExecutablePath.IndexOf("devenv.exe", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) > -1)
    {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

You can also do it by checking process name:

if (System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName == "devenv")
   return true;
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3  
Works in OnPaint, derived classes, constructors, etc. Best solution yet. –  Filip Kunc Dec 23 '10 at 21:50
8  
IMHO, this looks like an ugly solution. –  Camilo Martin Dec 6 '11 at 2:03
3  
Attention possible memory leak here. Process must be disposed. –  nalply May 21 '13 at 13:20
7  
While I'm sure this will work fine in most use cases, this solution has one principal flaw: Visual Studio is (at least in theory) not the only designer host. Therefore, this solution will only work if your designer is hosted by an application called devenv. –  stakx May 31 '13 at 19:52
    
Why not just return Application.ProductName.Contains("Visual Studio"); if you know your application name does not meet the criteria? –  Earth Engine Feb 6 at 23:51

Component ... as I know does not have DesignMode property. This property is proided by Control. But the problem is when CustomControl is located in Form in Designer, this CustomControl is running in Runtime mode.

I have experience that DesignMode property works correct only in Form

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Thanks for the tip! I never realized that before, but it makes perfect sense. Using the LicenseManager method provided by adrianbanks works perfect in these cases, where the control is embedded in another control/form. +1 for each! –  Josh Stribling Jan 28 '13 at 23:43

You should use Component.DesignMode property. As far as I know, this shouldn't be used from a constructor.

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3  
This doesn't work when your control is inside of another control or form that is being designed. –  Eric Sep 23 '09 at 9:17
1  
Actually it works pretty good in my components. I always had to add if (!DesignMode) to OnPaint methods to make sure it doesn't spam the design time. –  Bitterblue Feb 20 '13 at 14:58
    
This actually does work in Visual Studio 2012. Thanks. –  jonS90 Sep 13 '13 at 21:53
    
i dont kown why, however, it'is real avaliable now. –  Inshua Dec 26 '13 at 6:34

with cooperation with designer...can be used in Controls, Components, in all places

    private bool getDesignMode()
    {
        IDesignerHost host;
        if (Site != null)
        {
            host = Site.GetService(typeof(IDesignerHost)) as IDesignerHost;
            if (host != null)
            {
                if (host.RootComponent.Site.DesignMode) MessageBox.Show("Design Mode");
                else MessageBox.Show("Runtime Mode");
                return host.RootComponent.Site.DesignMode;
            }
        }
        MessageBox.Show("Runtime Mode");
        return false;
    }

MessageBox.Show( lines should be removed, only makes me sure, it works correct

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Another interesting method is described on that blog: http://www.undermyhat.org/blog/2009/07/in-depth-a-definitive-guide-to-net-user-controls-usage-mode-designmode-or-usermode/

Basically, it tests for the executing assembly being statically referenced from the entry assembly. It circumvents the need to track assembly names ('devenv.exe', 'monodevelop.exe'..).

However, it does not work in all other scenarios, where the assembly is dynamically loaded (VSTO being one example).

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