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Here's what happened.

Original directory was cloned to create a feature.

Cloned directory was pushed to the original before the original committed its changes.

Original was then committed.

I didn't know how to get the changes from both merged together. Whatever I tried, just switched between the two. I could pick individual files to revert to, but I couldn't seem to get an actual merge going. Mercurial didn't seem to think a merge was needed.

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What happens when you run hg merge ? –  David Levesque Jul 26 '12 at 6:13
    
Was there an update before the changes/commits in the original clone? –  Paul S Jul 26 '12 at 11:09
    
@PaulS: No. Certain files were changed in both directories without any updating between them. –  Stephane Jul 26 '12 at 14:16
    
@DavidLevesque: a message like "No need to merge into current head". If I switch the revision, it says I can't merge into the current revision or something like that. –  Stephane Jul 26 '12 at 14:16

1 Answer 1

If you have two heads in the same named branch, you just run hg merge to merge them.

If you are getting a message telling that there is nothing to merge, that means that you have only one head in that branch. You can check it with hg heads.

Either the branches were already merged, or they are in different named branches. If that's the case, you have to explicitly type the branch name to merge:

  1. Go to the branch that will receive the changes: hg update <branch>
  2. Tell mercurial to merge with the changes of the other branch: hg merge <other_branch>

Checking the graph is also a great help. You can do it with a GUI like TortoiseHg or in the terminal with the GraphLog extension. I just can't work without a graphical view to check what is going on.

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