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If a dictionary has an integer key stored as a string {'0': 'foo'} how would you reference that in Compound Field Names using .format()?

I get that it may be un-pythonic (and bad programming) to have a dict with such keys...but in this case, it's also not possible to use this way:

>>> a_dict = {0: 'int zero',
...           '0': 'string zero',
...           '0start': 'starts with zero'}
>>> a_dict
{0: 'int zero', '0': 'string zero', '0start': 'starts with zero'}
>>> a_dict[0]
'int zero'
>>> a_dict['0']
'string zero'
>>> " 0  is {0[0]}".format(a_dict)
' 0  is int zero'
>>> "'0' is {0['0']}".format(a_dict)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
KeyError: "'0'"
>>> "'0start' is {0[0start]}".format(a_dict)
"'0start' is starts with zero"

{0[0]}.format(a_dict) will always refer to the key int 0 even if there isn't one, so at least that's consistent:

>>> del a_dict[0]
>>> a_dict
{'0': 'string zero', '0start': 'starts with zero'}
>>> "{0[0]}".format(a_dict)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
KeyError: 0L

(And yes, I know I could just do '%s' % a_dict['0'] if required.)

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Additionally, from PEP 3101: Because keys are not quote-delimited, it is not possible to specify arbitrary dictionary keys (e.g., the strings "10" or ":-]") from within a format string. –  aneroid Jul 26 '12 at 5:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot. You'd need to pass in an additional argument to format.

>>> "'0' is {0[0]} {1}".format(a_dict, a_dict['0'])
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1  
You cannot being key here. No pun intended. –  aneroid Jul 26 '12 at 5:17

Edit: I figured out the problem. It is calling dict.getitem with the string "'0'", not '0' as expected. Therefore this is impossible. Sorry.

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1  
What prevents it is that indexing in the format specification is a bit half-assed, and doesn't require a delimiter, so it's ambiguous here, and therefore you just need to pick one or the other. –  Julian Jul 26 '12 at 5:03
1  
Except that it says that index_string can include any character besides ]. And it is calling getitem with the string 0 as can be confirmed by passing in a custom class. –  Antimony Jul 26 '12 at 5:05
    
Sorry, you were right. I see the problem now. –  Antimony Jul 26 '12 at 5:12
    
+1 @Julian for "half-assed" –  aneroid Jul 26 '12 at 5:15
    
@Antimony Nice idea to test it using classes. +1 –  aneroid Jul 26 '12 at 5:47

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