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I've been following tutorials online on C coding, and the code is using the Apache APR library. It uses the apr_proc_t structure to execute an external app. I'm confused about this function, could someone explain what this function means:

apr_status_t apr_procattr_cmdtype_set   (   apr_procattr_t *    attr,
        apr_cmdtype_e   cmd 
    )       

Set what type of command the child process will call.

Parameters:
    attr    The procattr we care about.
    cmd The type of command. One of:

                APR_SHELLCMD     --  Anything that the shell can handle
                APR_PROGRAM      --  Executable program   (default) 
                APR_PROGRAM_ENV  --  Executable program, copy environment
                APR_PROGRAM_PATH --  Executable program on PATH, copy env
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1 Answer 1

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The apr_procattr_cmdtype_set function is used to tell APR how you want to execute the external command, it probably just sets an internal flag and does a bit of bookkeeping.

Let us look at the enum apr_cmdtype_e:

APR_SHELLCMD
use the shell to invoke the program

APR_PROGRAM
invoke the program directly, no copied env

APR_PROGRAM_ENV
invoke the program, replicating our environment

APR_PROGRAM_PATH
find program on PATH, use our environment

APR_SHELLCMD_ENV
use the shell to invoke the program, replicating our environment

The first and last options (APR_SHELLCMD and APR_SHELLCMD_ENV) pretty much say "use a portable version of system" (with or without copying the current environment variables to the new process). The others are just variations on the Unix fork/exec pair with the flag choosing which of the exec family of functions to use.

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Thank you for your answer. –  Armen B. Aug 1 '12 at 7:08

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