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The code:

user = ... #pretend it has a value :)
instances = Array.new
Product.all.each do |product|
    productInstance = ProductInstance.new
    productInstance.user = user
    productInstance.product = product
    instances.push(productInstance)
end

Product and ProductInstance are both Rails models. Is a for-each loop on Product.all going to be slow? Just wondering if there is a better way of doing this...

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The product variable inside your block is instance of Product, so you made another model just to store Product and User instances together? Maybe it is faster to do not drag entire model with all attributes to productInstance, just put only product_id and user_id into it? –  denis.peplin Jul 26 '12 at 6:11
    
which database? –  Omar Qureshi Jul 26 '12 at 14:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Somthing like this should work.

instances = Product.all.map do |product|
    productInstance = ProductInstance.new(:user => user,:product => product)
end

or even

instances = Product.all.map do |product|
    ProductInstance.new(:user => user,:product => product)
end

For Mass assignment restriction you can try something like

instances = Product.all.map do |product|
    ProductInstance.new {|instance| instance.user = user;instance.product = product}
end
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Is there any way to do this if ProductInstance.user and ProductInstance.product are not mass-assignable (i.e. can't be passed into ProductInstance.new())? –  XåpplI'-I0llwlg'I - Jul 26 '12 at 6:05
    
@Dr.SteveBrule Please check the updated answer, hope that helps –  PriteshJ Jul 26 '12 at 7:45

Never iterate on your whole collection at one time.

Maybe this will work fine on your development box, and maybe on you fresh production.

But when your application gets popular and your DB will have serious amount of records, you will get time and memory problems with your code.

Use for example http://apidock.com/rails/ActiveRecord/Batches/ClassMethods/find_in_batches and learn how garbage collection works http://timetobleed.com/garbage-collection-slides-from-la-ruby-conference/

Product.find_in_batches do |products|
  products.each do |product|
    productInstance = ProductInstance.new
    productInstance.user = user
    productInstance.product = product
    instances.push(productInstance)  
  end
end
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this is by far most valuable answer in terms of performance. worth mentioning that there is #find_each method that gets rid of code nestiness. –  keymone Jul 26 '12 at 14:34

first in your ProductInstance model add

attr_accessible :user, :product 

and then

instances = Product.all.map {|product| ProductInstance.create(:user => user, :product => product)}

should work.

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it can be done like this also

 instances = Product.all.map {|product| ProductInstance.new(:user => user, :product => product)}
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I'd only change each to map (it's more idiomatic).

instances = Product.all.map do |product|
    productInstance = ProductInstance.new
    productInstance.user = user
    productInstance.product = product
    productInstance
end
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