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Using ASP.NET MVC3.

What I'm trying to do is initialize a Controller field/property with an Application state variable.

I.e. in my Application_Start() method I have

Application["stats"] = new Stats(); //this is fine

Accessing this via a Controller method, e.g.

public ActionResult Index()
{
  return View(HttpContext.Application["stats"]); //this is also fine
}

works fine too.

//blows up with a 'Object reference not set to an object' error.
private Stats stats;
public HomeController()
{
    stats= (Stats)(HttpContext.Application["stats"]);
}

Anyone able to explain what I'm failing to understand + how to go about fixing the problem ? If there's a better way, let me know (and just in case you're wondering, I'm not trying to load up application configuration or anything; just to keep live stats on the state of the website)

Thanks in advance

-Marcin

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The HttpContext is not yet initialize inside a controller constructor and is null.

If you need to access any HttpContext related stuff this could be done at most early inside the Initialize method:

public class HomeController: Controller
{
    private Stats stats;

    protected override void Initialize(RequestContext requestContext)
    {
        base.Initialize(requestContext);
        stats = (Stats)(HttpContext.Application["stats"]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Genius ! Thanks heaps for that. –  Marcin Jul 26 '12 at 7:27

The HttpContext from your question is the property on the controller and as Darin said, that is not yet initialized. You can however use this:

private Stats stats;
public HomeController()
{
    stats= (Stats)(System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Application["stats"]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
What about unit testing? HttpContext.Current kinda kills all hopes :-) –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 26 '12 at 7:28
    
Absolutely, unit testing will be a "challenge". Your solution is much better than mine. I just wanted to point out that you could get to the HttpContext in the constructor. –  John Landheer Jul 26 '12 at 11:10
    
HttpContext.Current is something that you really don't want to use. No matter the circumstances. There are always better ways. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 26 '12 at 11:12
    
Thanks for that. Just trying to understand how unit testing would be easier using plain HttpContext rather than System.Web.HttpContext ? I found hanselman.com/blog/… which suggests that it's possible to mock it. So would the ability to mock be the only reason ? (Sorry, I've seen a few examples about mocking with Moq but haven't had a serious play with it). –  Marcin Jul 26 '12 at 23:20

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