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I have a json string, which I should deSerialize to the following class

Class Data <T> {
    int found;
    Class<T> hits
}

How do I do it? This is the usual way

mapper.readValue(jsonString, Data.class);

But how do I mention what T stands for?

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possible duplicate of Jackson - Deserialize Generic class variable –  Programmer Bruce Jul 26 '12 at 16:10
    
see stackoverflow.com/questions/17400850/… –  Sloin Jul 1 '13 at 12:49

5 Answers 5

You can't do that: you must specify fully resolved type, like Data<MyType>. T is just a variable, and as is meaningless.

But if you mean that T will be known, just not statically, you need to create equivalent of TypeReference dynamically. Other questions referenced may already mention this, but it should look something like:

public Data<T> read(InputStream json, Class<T> contentClass) {
   JavaType type = mapper.getTypeFactory().constructParametricType(Data.class, contentClass.class);
   return mapper.readValue(json, type);
}
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What if I dont know what class it is until runtime? I will get the class as a parameter during runtime. Like this public <T> void deSerialize(Class<T> clazz { ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.readValue(jsonString, new TypeReference<Json<T>>() {}); } –  Gowtham Natarajan Jul 27 '12 at 5:45
    
I have asked the full question here stackoverflow.com/questions/11659844/… –  Gowtham Natarajan Jul 27 '12 at 5:49
    
Then just pass the class as is, no need for TypeReference: return mapper.readValue(json, clazz); What exactly is the problem here? –  StaxMan Jul 27 '12 at 17:37
    
The problem is that "Data" is a generic class. I need to specify what type T is at runtime. The parameter clazz is what T us at runtime. So, how to call readValue? calling it with new TypeReference>Json<T>> does not work The full question is here stackoverflow.com/questions/11659844/… –  Gowtham Natarajan Jul 27 '12 at 18:28
    
Ok. Then you need to use TypeFactory.. I will edit my answer. –  StaxMan Jul 27 '12 at 19:19

You need to create a TypeReference object for each generic type you use and use that for deserialization. For example,

mapper.readValue(jsonString, new TypeReference<Data<String>>() {});
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I have to use it as TypeReference<Data<T>>(){} ... But I am getting the following error - cannot access private java.lang.class.Class() from java.lang.class. Failed to set access. Cannot make a java.lang.Class constructor accessible –  Gowtham Natarajan Jul 26 '12 at 19:46
    
No, not Data<T>, that is NOT a type. You must specify actual class; otherwise it is same as Data<Object>. –  StaxMan Jul 27 '12 at 4:38
    
What if I dont know what class it is until runtime? I will get the class as a parameter during runtime. Like this public <T> void deSerialize(Class<T> clazz { ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper(); mapper.readValue(jsonString, new TypeReference<Json<T>>() {}); } –  Gowtham Natarajan Jul 27 '12 at 5:43
    
I have asked the full question correctly here stackoverflow.com/questions/11659844/… –  Gowtham Natarajan Jul 27 '12 at 5:49

Just write a static method in Util class. I am reading a Json from a file. you can give String also to readValue

public static <T> T convertJsonToPOJO(String filePath, Class<?> target) throws JsonParseException, JsonMappingException, IOException, ClassNotFoundException {
        ObjectMapper objectMapper = new ObjectMapper();
        return objectMapper.readValue(new File(filePath), objectMapper .getTypeFactory().constructCollectionType(List.class, Class.forName(target.getName())));
}

Usage:

List<TaskBean> list =  Util.<List<TaskBean>>convertJsonToPOJO("E:/J2eeWorkspaces/az_workspace_svn/az-client-service/dir1/dir2/filename.json", TaskBean.class);
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You can wrap it in another class which knows the type of your generic type.

Eg,

class Wrapper {
 private Data<Something> data;
}
mapper.readValue(jsonString, Wrapper.class);

Here Something is a concrete type. You need a wrapper per reified type. Otherwise Jackson does not know what objects to create.

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first thing you do is serialize, then you can do deserialize.
so when you do serialize, you should use @JsonTypeInfo to let jackson write class information into your json data. What you can do is like this:

Class Data {
int found;
@JsonTypeInfo(use=JsonTypeInfo.Id.CLASS, include=JsonTypeInfo.As.PROPERTY, property="@class")
Class hits
}

Then when you deserialize, you will find jackson has deserialize your data into a class which your variable hits actually is at runtime.

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is this approach tried and tested. Does this work? –  JAGAMOT Jan 17 '13 at 5:20

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