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Why do the MISRA rules prohibit the use of #undef in a program? If I want to limit the scope of any macro, how to do it without using #undef?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Basically, because MISRA is too paranoid and doesn't trust programmers to know what they are doing :-) Seriously, MISRA tries to prevent certain errors and is guided by the belief that if you forbid potentially problematic code constructs, reliability of software suddenly increases. Whether that is true is a matter of debate. In the case of #undef, the likely reason is that once a macro is defined, its expansion stays put and is always that from its definiton. If you allow #undef, the identifier could be reused as a variable, function name, typedef or struct/union member, or even as a macro with a, gasp, different expansion. It's some way to prevent identifier shadowing, if you will. Scary, isn't it?! You decide!

To answer your second question, the only way to limit the scope of a macro if #undef can't be used is to use the end-of-file, which is the only other standard defined way to end the scope of a macro. In other words, you have to split up your source files into smaller ones and define the macro only when compiling the particular file where it is needed.

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"Whether that is true is a matter of debate": This is a euphemism. This kind of bullcrap tends to drive good programmers away from projects (because they often have the choice to go and work somewhere else), and decreases code quality. –  Alexandre C. Jul 26 '12 at 9:01
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As someone forced to use (a subset of) MISRA, I can wholeheartedly agree. If some ignorant management droid forced ALL of MISRAs rule to be obeyed, I'd be inclined to put heaven and hell in motion to make them understand why this is a bad idea. One way is to ask for scientific research indicating that MISRA prevents more bugs than it creates due to the contorted way to implement around its rules. –  Jens Jul 26 '12 at 9:46
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The fact someone reads and contributes to StackOverflow already sets them apart from most developers. There are a huge number of 9 to 5ers who just get their code to "work". A lot of developers have never even heard of "promotion" never mind know the rules about it. Personally, I feel if you know why a rule exists and your solution better by "violating" that rule then the better code should win. It's a difficult issue though, as what's OK for my car radio is not necessarily OK for the breaking system. –  Richard Corden Jul 30 '12 at 19:06
    
@Jens MISRA-C is heavily based on scientific research, mainly by studies and books by computer scientists Les Hatton and Andrew Koenig (although none of them were in the MISRA committee). However, I don't believe either of them mentioned #undef, that particular rule is probably lacking a rationale. –  Lundin Aug 7 '12 at 6:35
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Anyway, I think the upcoming MISRA standard will prove much better as they have weeded out a lot of rules without a proper rationale, or demoted them to advisory. My own opinion of MISRA is that you should read it with scepticism and make your own coding standard based on it. I have designed such a coding standard for my company, that removed 3-4 weird MISRA rules and added some things not in MISRA, most notably far stricter rules against function-like macros, global variables and other such icky stuff. –  Lundin Aug 7 '12 at 20:52

MISRA has its own explanation on why the usage of #undef is banned:

#undef should normally not be needed. Its use can lead to confusion with respect to the existence or meaning of a macro when it is used in the code.

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Requesting you to give an example on this. I can't imagine how it can create confusion ? –  bubble Aug 14 '12 at 8:11
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@bubble - see my answer stackoverflow.com/a/12055764/1614319 as to how confusion can reign –  Andrew Nov 8 '12 at 7:36

In reply to @Bubble's comment above:

Requesting you to give an example on this. I can't imagine how it can create confusion ?

Imagine the scenario...

#define MACRO some-definition
.
.
MACRO // Invovation 1
.
.
MACRO // Invocation 2
.
.

And then someone comes along and inserts, between the existing invocations of MACRO

.
.
#undef MACRO
#define MACRO something-else
MACRO // Between (1) and (2)
.
.

The original second invocation of MACRO will not do what you expected!

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That's a fair point, but could perhaps be resolved by requiring that #undef only by used to undefine a macro defined in a particular clearly-defined place. In other words, #define MACRO ... #undef MACRO would be allowed, but #undef MACRO ... #define MACRO would not. In the former situation, if MACRO was unexpectedly defined and used outside that scope, errors would occur when the new macro is defined and when a succeeding attempt is made to use the old one. –  supercat Dec 7 '12 at 19:53
    
At the moment, the rule is well defined, and decidable/deterministic... and in most circumstances justified. However, there is nothing to stop the rule being deviated against if a specific circumstance requires it. –  Andrew Dec 8 '12 at 7:53
    
PS: The rule remains (as an advisory) in the imminent MISRA C:2012 –  Andrew Dec 8 '12 at 7:55
    
And @Bubbles asked "Requesting you to give an example on this. I can't imagine how it can create confusion ?" - which I have done. –  Andrew Dec 8 '12 at 7:56
    
I've twice encountered situations when programming embedded systems where it was necessary to produce two routines which were almost identical except that they controlled different resources (on both controllers, a statement like structPtr->Foo += 2; would be more than three times as big and slow as someStruct.Foo += 2;, so duplicating code was less wasteful than a general-purpose routine would have been). I felt the most idiomatic approach was to #define DRIVE 1/#include "drive.i"/#undef DRIVE/#define DRIVE 2/#include "drive.i". Then #drive.i #defined many macros which... –  supercat Dec 10 '12 at 15:51

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