Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I know a quick way to convert a byte/short/int/long array to ByteBuffer, and then obtain a byte array. For instance, to convert a byte array to short array I can do:

byte[] bArray = { 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 };

ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.wrap(byteArray);
ShortBuffer sb = bb.asShortBuffer();
short[] shortArray = new short[byteArray.length / 2];
sb.get(shortArray);

produces a short array like this: [256, 0, 0, 0, 256, 0, 0, 0].

How can I do the inverse operation using java.nio classes?

Now I am doing this:

shortArray[] = {256, 0, 0, 0, 256, 0, 0, 0};
ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(shortArray.length * 2);
for (short s : shortArray) {
    bb.putShort(s);
}
return bb.array();

And I obtain the original [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0] byte array. But I want to use a method like ShortBuffer.asByteBuffer(), not a manual loop to do it.

I have found a request to Sun of 2001, but they did not accept it ;-((

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

What about this? :

    bb.asShortBuffer().put(shortArray);

Then bb contains your data.

Full code:

public class Test {
    public static void main(final String args[]) {
        short[] arr = { 256, 0, 0, 0, 256, 0, 0, 0 };
        for (byte b : F(arr)) {
            System.out.print(b);
        }
    }

    public static byte[] F(short[] arr) {
        java.nio.ByteBuffer bb = java.nio.ByteBuffer.allocate(arr.length * 2);
        bb.asShortBuffer().put(arr);
        return bb.array(); // this returns the "raw" array, it's shared and not copied!
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
that's it!! thank you! –  logoff Jul 26 '12 at 9:13
    
Wow, this is so clever! –  Sarge Borsch Feb 5 '14 at 19:53

I would remember the ByteBuffer you used to create the ShortBuffer from as its a view onto the same buffer.

Otherwise it appears the only way to get this back is to use reflections to get the bb field.

BTW: Using a direct ByteBuffer can be significantly faster depending on what you are doing esp if you use native byte order.

share|improve this answer
    
Using a direct ByteBuffer is faster, but I cannot access the backing array later. –  logoff Jul 26 '12 at 9:20
    
What do you use the backing array for? –  Peter Lawrey Jul 26 '12 at 9:21
    
not in my snippet, but I finally need it. anyway your comment is correct, but I need the array, hehe. –  logoff Jul 26 '12 at 9:24
    
My point is that often you need it for something like writing to a file or a socket. If you use NIO you can avoid turning it into a byte array. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 26 '12 at 9:26
    
yes, it is true. I am doing some "strange things", only concept proof of concept. thank you anyway –  logoff Jul 26 '12 at 9:28

Well, in the declaration

ShortBuffer sb = bb.asShortBuffer();

AFAIK, your ShortBuffer is just a view of the original ByteBuffer. So, you could always access the original ByteBuffer variable bb and see the data as modified through your CharBuffer reference sb.

The documentation for asCharBuffer says:

[...] Changes to this buffer's content will be visible in the new buffer, and vice versa [...]

share|improve this answer
    
the problem is that I do not have the original ByteBuffer... –  logoff Jul 26 '12 at 8:32
1  
@logoff Your code snippet is quite misleading then. –  Edwin Dalorzo Jul 26 '12 at 8:38
    
@logoff How about ByteBuffer.wrap(sb.toString().getBytes())? –  Edwin Dalorzo Jul 26 '12 at 8:41
    
it does not work. the result is [106, 97, 118, 97, 46, 110, 105, 111, 46, 72, 101, 97, 112, 83, 104, 111, 114, 116, 66, 117, 102, 102, 101, 114, 91, 112, 111, 115, 61, 48, 32, 108, 105, 109, 61, 56, 32, 99, 97, 112, 61, 56, 93]. it is because sb.toString() return java.nio.HeapShortBuffer[pos=0 lim=8 cap=8] –  logoff Jul 26 '12 at 8:44
    
@EdwinDalorzo, Man even if that does work, sb.toString().getBytes() is extremely ugly if we are hacking toString like this... –  Pacerier Aug 18 '14 at 2:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.