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I am reading "C# via CLR" and on page 380, there's a note saying the following:

Note The Enum class defines a HasFlag method defined as follows

public Boolean HasFlag(Enum flag);

Using this method, you could rewrite the call to Console.WriteLine like this:

Console.WriteLine("Is {0} hidden? {1}", file, attributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Hidden));

However, I recommend that you avoid the HasFlag method for this reason:

Since it takes a parameter of type Enum, any value you pass to it must be boxed, requiring a memory allocation ."

I can not understand this bolded statement -- why "

any value you pass to it must be boxed

"? flag parament type is Enum, which is value type, why here still got boxing? here "any value you pass to it must be boxed" should mean boxing happens when you pass value type to parameter "Enum flag", right?

share|improve this question
    
It all comes down to a single, but confusing, statement: Enum is not an enum... – Marc Gravell Jul 26 '12 at 9:00
    
@MarcGravell Indeed, I've spent a long chain of comments trying to defend my answer from the fact that people refuse to believe that statement. Confused by: ValueType is not a value type lol... – Adam Houldsworth Jul 26 '12 at 9:03
up vote 4 down vote accepted

In this instance, two boxing calls are required before you even get into the HasFlags method. One is for resolving the method call on the value type to the base type method, the other is passing the value type as a reference type parameter. You can see the same in IL if you do var type = 1.GetType();, the literal int 1 is boxed before the GetType() call. The boxing on method call seems to be only when methods are not overridden in the value type definition itself, more can be read here: Does calling a method on a value type result in boxing in .NET?

The HasFlags takes an Enum class argument, so the boxing will occur here. You are trying to pass what is a value type into something expecting a reference type. To represent values as references, boxing occurs.

There is lots of compiler support for value types and their inheritance (with Enum / ValueType) that confuses the situation when trying to explain it. People seem to think that because Enum and ValueType is in the inheritance chain of value types boxing suddenly doesn't apply. If this were true, the same could be said of object as everything inherits that - but as we know this is false.

This doesn't stop the fact that representing a value type as a reference type will incur boxing.

And we can prove this in IL (look for the box codes):

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var f = Fruit.Apple;
        var result = f.HasFlag(Fruit.Apple);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

[Flags]
enum Fruit
{
    Apple
}



.method private hidebysig static 
    void Main (
        string[] args
    ) cil managed 
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x2050
    // Code size 28 (0x1c)
    .maxstack 2
    .entrypoint
    .locals init (
        [0] valuetype ConsoleApplication1.Fruit f,
        [1] bool result
    )

    IL_0000: nop
    IL_0001: ldc.i4.0
    IL_0002: stloc.0
    IL_0003: ldloc.0
    IL_0004: box ConsoleApplication1.Fruit
    IL_0009: ldc.i4.0
    IL_000a: box ConsoleApplication1.Fruit
    IL_000f: call instance bool [mscorlib]System.Enum::HasFlag(class [mscorlib]System.Enum)
    IL_0014: stloc.1
    IL_0015: call string [mscorlib]System.Console::ReadLine()
    IL_001a: pop
    IL_001b: ret
} // end of method Program::Main

The same can be seen when representing a value type as ValueType, it also results in boxing:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int i = 1;
        ValueType v = i;

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}


.method private hidebysig static 
    void Main (
        string[] args
    ) cil managed 
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x2050
    // Code size 17 (0x11)
    .maxstack 1
    .entrypoint
    .locals init (
        [0] int32 i,
        [1] class [mscorlib]System.ValueType v
    )

    IL_0000: nop
    IL_0001: ldc.i4.1
    IL_0002: stloc.0
    IL_0003: ldloc.0
    IL_0004: box [mscorlib]System.Int32
    IL_0009: stloc.1
    IL_000a: call string [mscorlib]System.Console::ReadLine()
    IL_000f: pop
    IL_0010: ret
} // end of method Program::Main
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you are right, but in this case the boxing in occurring due to the call the Console.WriteLine. Jeff Richter has a large section in the book about avoiding boxing, and I believe this is where it comes from. – stevethethread Jul 26 '12 at 8:41
    
@stevethethread So why are there boxing IL commands in my sample? – Adam Houldsworth Jul 26 '12 at 8:41
    
This isn't answer, this just repeats the observation leading to this question. – hvd Jul 26 '12 at 8:42
    
@hvd It explains why there is boxing, Enum is a class... – Adam Houldsworth Jul 26 '12 at 8:42
    
@AdamHouldsworth ...which derives from ValueType. – hvd Jul 26 '12 at 8:43

Enum inherits from ValueType which is... a class! Hence the boxing.

Note that the Enum class can represents any enumeration, whatever its underlying type is, as a boxed value. Whereas a value such as FileAttributes.Hidden will be represented as real value type, int.

Edit: let's differentiate the type and the representation here. An int is represented in memory as 32 bits. Its type derives from ValueType. As soon as you assign an int to an object or derived class (ValueType class, Enum class), you're boxing it, effectively changing its representation to a class now containing that 32 bits, plus additional class information.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand your first sentence. void f(int i) { } void g() { f(3); } -- int also inherits from ValueType, but there is no boxing there. Same if int is changed to a concrete enum type. – hvd Jul 26 '12 at 8:33
    
That can't be the whole story. System.Int32 inherits from ValueType, too. – sblom Jul 26 '12 at 8:34
    
Yes, the method here takes an int, not object. – stevethethread Jul 26 '12 at 8:34
3  
@JulienLebosquain Yes, it does. All structs inherit from ValueType. – hvd Jul 26 '12 at 8:35
    
@JulienLebosquain See the struct page on msdn msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/saxz13w4.aspx :: A struct cannot inherit from another struct or class, and it cannot be the base of a class. All structs inherit directly from System.ValueType, which inherits from System.Object. – SynerCoder Jul 26 '12 at 8:42

It's worth noting that a generic HasFlag<T>(T thing, T flags) which is about 30 times faster than the Enum.HasFlag extension method can be written in about 30 lines of code. It can even be made into an extension method. Unfortunately, it's not possible in C# to restrict such a method to only take things of enumerated types; consequently, Intellisense will pop up the method even for types for which it is not applicable. I think if one used some language other than C# or vb.net to write the extension method it might be possible to make it pop up only when it should, but I'm not familiar enough with other languages to try such a thing.

internal static class EnumHelper<T1>
{
    public static Func<T1, T1, bool> TestOverlapProc = initProc;
    public static bool Overlaps(SByte p1, SByte p2) { return (p1 & p2) != 0; }
    public static bool Overlaps(Byte p1, Byte p2) { return (p1 & p2) != 0; }
    public static bool Overlaps(Int16 p1, Int16 p2) { return (p1 & p2) != 0; }
    public static bool Overlaps(UInt16 p1, UInt16 p2) { return (p1 & p2) != 0; }
    public static bool Overlaps(Int32 p1, Int32 p2) { return (p1 & p2) != 0; }
    public static bool Overlaps(UInt32 p1, UInt32 p2) { return (p1 & p2) != 0; }
    public static bool Overlaps(Int64 p1, Int64 p2) { return (p1 & p2) != 0; }
    public static bool Overlaps(UInt64 p1, UInt64 p2) { return (p1 & p2) != 0; }
    public static bool initProc(T1 p1, T1 p2)
    {
        Type typ1 = typeof(T1);
        if (typ1.IsEnum) typ1 = Enum.GetUnderlyingType(typ1);
        Type[] types = { typ1, typ1 };
        var method = typeof(EnumHelper<T1, T1>).GetMethod("Overlaps", types);
        if (method == null) method = typeof(T1).GetMethod("Overlaps", types);
        if (method == null) throw new MissingMethodException("Unknown type of enum");
        TestOverlapProc = (Func<T1, T1, bool>)Delegate.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<T1, T1, bool>), method);
        return TestOverlapProc(p1, p2);
    }
}
static class EnumHelper
{
    public static bool Overlaps<T>(this T p1, T p2) where T : struct
    {
        return EnumHelper<T>.TestOverlapProc(p1, p2);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's some magic! going to steal it :) I think you should definitely make it an answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9519596/hasflag-with-a-generic-enum – nawfal Jun 21 '13 at 7:57
    
Caching method will make it even faster. – IllidanS4 Jun 3 '15 at 7:42

When ever you pass a value type of a method that takes object as a parameter, as in the case of console.writeline, there will be an inherent boxing operation. Jeffery Richter discusses this in detail in the same book you mention.

In this case you are using the string.format method of console.writeline, and that takes a params array of object[]. So your bool, will be cast to object, so hence you get a boxing operation. You can avoid this by calling .ToString() on the bool.

share|improve this answer
    
Enum.HasFlag's parameter type isn't object. – hvd Jul 26 '12 at 8:34
    
That's boxing the bool result of Enum.HasFlag(), not the argument to HasFlag()... – sblom Jul 26 '12 at 8:35
    
Enum.HasFlag() returns bool, a value type, and so, boxing. – stevethethread Jul 26 '12 at 8:37
    
@stevethethread That isn't what this question is about, and besides, returning a value type doesn't require boxing unless the function is declared as returning a reference type (object). – hvd Jul 26 '12 at 8:38
    
but here "any value you pass to it must be boxed" should mean boxing happens when you pass value type to parameter "Enum flag", right? – user1553932 Jul 26 '12 at 8:40

There are two boxing operations involved in this call, not just one. And both are required for one simple reason: Enum.HasFlag() needs type information, not just values, for both this and flag.

Most of the time, an enum value truly is just a set of bits and the compiler has all the type information it needs from the enum types represented in the method signature.

However, in the case of Enum.HasFlags() the very first thing it does is call this.GetType() and flag.GetType() and make sure they're identical. If you wanted the typeless version, you'd be asking if ((attribute & flag) != 0), instead of calling Enum.HasFlags().

share|improve this answer
    
Some time passed but anyway: this is not true. If you ask for GetType() inside some method then boxing will occur just inside this method. You could easily test it with simple value type with some method which call GetType() for example. You'll see that boxing will occur inside your method, not when you calling it from some outer code. – iw.kuchin Oct 9 '12 at 5:13
    
@iw.kuchin: The type System.Enum is a class type, as is the ironically-named System.ValueType. Calling Enum.HasFlag(Enum) requires casting its argument to System.Enum, which means it will be boxed before the HasFlag method gets a chance to execute. – supercat Dec 18 '12 at 17:30
    
@supercat Yes, and this is the real reason because boxing occurs here. Not because type information is needed somewhere inside Enum.HasFlag(). – iw.kuchin Dec 20 '12 at 9:36

Moreover, there's more than single boxing in Enum.HasFlag:

public bool HasFlag(Enum flag)
{
    if (!base.GetType().IsEquivalentTo(flag.GetType()))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(Environment.GetResourceString("Argument_EnumTypeDoesNotMatch", new object[]
        {
            flag.GetType(),
            base.GetType()
        }));
    }
    ulong num = Enum.ToUInt64(flag.GetValue());
    ulong num2 = Enum.ToUInt64(this.GetValue());
    return (num2 & num) == num;
}

Look at GetValue method calls.

Update. Looks like MS had optimized this method in .NET 4.5 (the source code has been downloaded from referencesource):

    [System.Security.SecuritySafeCritical]
    public Boolean HasFlag(Enum flag) { 
        if (flag == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("flag"); 
        Contract.EndContractBlock(); 

        if (!this.GetType().IsEquivalentTo(flag.GetType())) { 
            throw new ArgumentException(Environment.GetResourceString("Argument_EnumTypeDoesNotMatch", flag.GetType(), this.GetType()));
        }

        return InternalHasFlag(flag); 
    }

    [System.Security.SecurityCritical]  // auto-generated 
    [ResourceExposure(ResourceScope.None)]
    [MethodImplAttribute(MethodImplOptions.InternalCall)] 
    private extern bool InternalHasFlag(Enum flags);
share|improve this answer
    
Is that the actual implementation? Seems needlessly slow. It's possible, and not overly hard, to write a static method bool HasFlag<T>(T p1, T p2) which will run about more than 10x as fast as enum.HasFlag. – supercat Dec 18 '12 at 17:37
    
@supercat: excellent question, indeed. It is actual for .NET 4.0, for .NET 4.5 it is different. See updated answer. – Dennis Dec 19 '12 at 5:33
    
I wonder how that affects performance? Using .net 4.0, my generic method seems about 6x slower than using & but 30x faster than Enum.HasFlag. Actually, I would think that testing an enumeration for flag values would be a sufficiently frequent operation that would be worthy of language support, especially since a language could separate out HasAny, HasAll, and Has cases, restricting the latter to operands that were constant powers of two [since it's otherwise ambiguous whether SomeEnum.Has(3) should mean (SomeEnum & 3) != 0 or (SomeEnum & 3)==3.] – supercat Dec 19 '12 at 15:46
    
See my answer for the my code, if you'd like to benchmark it against the .net 4.5 version of HasFlag. (Incidentally, as shown, my version will work with any struct type T that defines an Overlaps(T,T) overload; not sure that's useful, but it shouldn't affect the benchmarks since each type is only evaluated once). – supercat Dec 19 '12 at 15:51

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