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How do I sort a vector of pairs based on the second element of the pair?

I have a vector of this type: vector< pair<float, int> > vect; I want sort its elements according to the descending order of the floats values (the first value of pairs). For example vect = [<8.6, 4>, <5.2, 9>, <7.1, 23>], after sorting I want to have: [<5.2, 9>, <7.1, 23>, <8.6, 4>] how can I simply do that in C++ ?

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marked as duplicate by pmr, Björn Pollex, larsmans, Chris A., Jason Sturges Jul 27 '12 at 2:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
function, that take the first element in pair and compare it. is it possible for you? (after this you can make any realization of sorting function or use libraries like boost) –  gaussblurinc Jul 26 '12 at 9:08
    
check this one out. it's a boost solution -> stackoverflow.com/questions/279854/… –  Emir Akaydın Jul 26 '12 at 9:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
struct cmp_by_first {
  template<typename T>
  bool operator<(const T& x, const T& y) const { return x.first < y.first; }
};

std::sort(vect.begin(), vect.end(), cmp_by_first());
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std::vector<std::pair<float, int>> vect = 
{
    std::make_pair(8.6, 4),
    std::make_pair(5.2, 9),
    std::make_pair(7.1, 23)
};
std::sort(vect.begin(), vect.end(), [](const std::pair<float, int>& first, const std::pair<float, int>& second)
{
    return first.first < second.first;
});
for (const auto& p : vect)
{
    std::cout << p.first << " " << p.second << std::endl;
}

C++11.

http://liveworkspace.org/code/5f14daa5c183f1ef4e349ea26854f1b0

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Since it's c++11, you could say: std::vector< std::pair<float, int> > vect = {{8.6, 4}, {5.2, 9}, {7.1, 23}}; –  Man of One Way Jul 26 '12 at 9:20

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