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I am writing a private method for my class. I am passing as a parameter to this a list of integers, representing the ID of a row in my SQL Server 2008 table.

I wish to return a List<string> of the "Name" (a column) on all rows where one of the passed in integers is equal to an "ID". So if I pass in the List<int> {1, 2, 3 }.

I want to essentially run the commmand (SELECT Name FROM Table WHERE ID = 1 OR ID = 2 OR ID = 3).ToList<string>().

The database I am using is very busy, and thus it is very important that I optimise my solution as much as possible. With this in mind, I am wondering if it would be better practice for me to create a link to this DB using a .dbml file and use Linq to SQL to query the database?

Or simply to create an SQLCommand object, execute it once, iterate over a reader and save it in a List? What is the most optimal way to do this ? Is creating a .dbml file to represent a very busy database bad practice ?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Creating a .dbml has very little do to with server-side performance; that changes the tooling at the calling end - but the server won't really notice the difference between commands coming from .dbml vs hand-coded, at least: not for things this simple (I should note that for complex queries, hand-coded queries can often out-perform machine-generated queries).

In terms of performance at the caller; a .dbml is just a wrapper around all the usual command/reader/etc - it can't make things faster. In some cases it might make it slower, if it doesn't do a good job of parsing an expression, or doesn't cache the parsed outcome (in terms of the TSQL).

What I will say, though, is that dapper will handle this very nicely for you:

var ids = new List<int>{1,2,3};
var names = conn.Select<string>("select Name from Table where ID in @ids",
      new {ids}).ToList();

dapper will spot the in @ids usage, and will expand that as parameters, executing:

select Name from Table where ID in (@p__0, @p__1, @p__2)

(or something like that) - passing 1, 2 and 3 as those values.

That gives you:

  • convenience at the caller
  • performance at the caller (dapper is heavily optimized)
  • full parameterization
    • allowing for optimal query-plan re-use at the server

More generally, dapper will also happily handle general entity mapping, for example:

int id = 12345;
var customer = conn.Select<Customer>("select * from Custom where Id = @id",
    new { id }).Single();
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Several things I would do:

A. Use a table valued parameter

CREATE TYPE LocationTableType AS TABLE 
( ID INT);
GO

B. Use a stored procedure (with your TVP)

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo. usp_GetLocationNames
    @TVP LocationTableType READONLY
    AS 
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ UNCOMMITTED;

    SELECT Name
    FROM dbo.Location l
    JOIN @TVP t ON l.ID = t.ID

C. Allow dirty reads - SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ UNCOMMITTED;

D. Don't count rows - SET NOCOUNT ON;

E. Cache the resultset for a period of time

Since I know very little about your application or your situation, these items are 'generally' what I would do with most procs. Obviously, if you were checking someone's bank account balance before dispensing cash you would not allow dirty reads, nor cache the resultset. But in most situations, these things are acceptable.

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INT(50) ? Also SET NOCOUNT ON isn't necessary for a single select. –  M Afifi Jul 26 '12 at 10:04
    
@MAfifi - oops... copy/paste issues, or maybe lack of coffee (too early). –  Chris Gessler Jul 26 '12 at 10:10

In order to limit the traffic is better to reduce the number of roundtrip to the database, so is betetr if you issue just one command, maybe using the IN clause instead of multiple or and parametrize your query.

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The question only ever refers to 1 command/round-trip; what you say is true, but doesn't seem relevant to the question...? –  Marc Gravell Jul 26 '12 at 9:48

If you select by numeric IDs then it is safe to form WHERE clause dynamically (i.e. WHERE ID IN (1,2,3,...)

More advanced way is to create SP with XML parameter. Sample code snippet:

DECLARE @xmlIds AS XML
SET @xmlIds = '<Ids><ID>1</ID><ID>2</ID></Ids>'

SELECT Name FROM Table
WHERE ID IN (
    SELECT
        Data.row.value('.', 'INT')
        FROM
        @XmlIds.nodes('/Ids/ID') As Data(row))
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You can do all of this natively using native C# and Sql 2008. In Sql 2008 it introduced User-Defined Table Types, and Table-Valued Parameters for Stored Procedures.

So the following would give you exactly what you want,

CREATE TYPE UdtId AS TABLE
(
    [ID] INT NOT NULL
    PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED ([ID] ASC)
)

CREATE PROCEDURE spGetCustomerByIds
    @IDS UdtId READONLY
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT
        C.*
    FROM Customer C
    INNER JOIN UdtId I ON
        C.ID = I.ID
END

Hopefully the C# code behind it will be obvious, but it would look like,

public foo GetCustomerDataByIds(IEnumerable<int> ids)
{
    using (var command = new SqlCommand())
    using (var adatper = new SqlAdapter())
    using (var dataSet = new DataSet())
    {
        command.Text = "spGetCustomerByIds";
        command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        command.Parameters.AddWithValue("@IDS", GetDataTableOfIds(ids));
        // execute and return the stuff you're after
    }
}

private DataTable GetDataTableOfIds(IEnumerable<int> ids)
{
    var table = new DataTable();
    table.Columns.Add(new DataColumns("ID", typeof(int));
    foreach (var id in ids)
    {
        table.Rows.Add(id);
    }
    return table;
}
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