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First of all: I am completely a newbie in mutex/multithread programming, so sorry for any error in advance...

I have a program that runs multiple threads. The threads (usually one per cpu core) do a lot of calculation and "thinking" and then sometimes they decide to call a particular (shared) method that updates some statistics. The concurrency on statistics updates is managed through the use of a mutex:

stats_mutex.lock();
common_area->update_thread_stats( ... );
stats_mutex.unlock();

Now to the problem. Of all those threads there is one particular thread that need almost
realtime priority, because it's the only thread that actually operates.

With "almost realtime priority" I mean:

Let's suppose thread t0 is the "privileged one" and t1....t15 are the normal ones.What happens now is:

  • Thread t1 acquires lock.
  • Thread t2, t3, t0 call the lock() method and wait for it to succeed.
  • Thread t1 calls unlock()
  • One (at random, as far as i know) of the threads t2, t3, t0 succeeds in acquiring the lock, and the other ones continue to wait.

What I need is:

  • Thread t1 acquire lock.
  • Thread t2, t3, t0 call the lock() method and wait for it to succeed.
  • Thread t1 calls unlock()
  • Thread t0 acquires lock since it's privileged

So, what's the best (possibly simplest) method to do this thing?

What I was thinking is to have a bool variable called "privileged_needs_lock".

But I think I need another mutex to manage access to this variable... I dont know if this is the right way...

Additional info:

  • my threads use C++11 (as of gcc 4.6.3)
  • code needs to run on both Linux and Windows (but tested only on Linux at the moment).
  • performance on locking mechanism is not an issue (my performance problem are in internal thread calculations, and thread number will always be low, one or two per cpu core at maximum)

Any idea is appreciated. Thanks


The below solution works (three mutex way):

#include <thread>
#include <iostream>
#include "unistd.h"

std::mutex M;
std::mutex N;
std::mutex L;

void lowpriolock(){
  L.lock();
  N.lock();
  M.lock();
  N.unlock();
}

void lowpriounlock(){
  M.unlock();
  L.unlock();
}

void highpriolock(){
  N.lock();
  M.lock();
  N.unlock();
}

void highpriounlock(){
  M.unlock();
}

void hpt(const char* s){
  using namespace std;
  //cout << "hpt trying to get lock here" << endl;
  highpriolock();
  cout << s << endl;
  sleep(2);
  highpriounlock();
}

void lpt(const char* s){
  using namespace std;
  //cout << "lpt trying to get lock here" << endl;
  lowpriolock();
  cout << s << endl;
  sleep(2);
  lowpriounlock();
}

int main(){
std::thread t0(lpt,"low prio t0 working here");
std::thread t1(lpt,"low prio t1 working here");
std::thread t2(hpt,"high prio t2 working here");
std::thread t3(lpt,"low prio t3 working here");
std::thread t4(lpt,"low prio t4 working here");
std::thread t5(lpt,"low prio t5 working here");
std::thread t6(lpt,"low prio t6 working here");
std::thread t7(lpt,"low prio t7 working here");
//std::cout << "All threads created" << std::endl;
t0.join();
t1.join();
t2.join();
t3.join();
t4.join();
t5.join();
t6.join();
t7.join();
return 0;
}

Tried the below solution as suggested but it does not work (compile with " g++ -std=c++0x -o test test.cpp -lpthread"):

#include <thread>
#include <mutex>

#include "time.h"
#include "pthread.h"

std::mutex l;

void waiter(){
  l.lock();
  printf("Here i am, waiter starts\n");
  sleep(2);
  printf("Here i am, waiter ends\n");
  l.unlock();
}

void privileged(int id){
  usleep(200000);
  l.lock();
  usleep(200000);
  printf("Here i am, privileged (%d)\n",id);
  l.unlock();  
}

void normal(int id){
  usleep(200000);
  l.lock();
  usleep(200000);
  printf("Here i am, normal (%d)\n",id);
  l.unlock();    
}

int main(){
  std::thread tw(waiter);
  std::thread t1(normal,1);
  std::thread t0(privileged,0);
  std::thread t2(normal,2);

  sched_param sch;
  int policy; 

  pthread_getschedparam(t0.native_handle(), &policy, &sch);
  sch.sched_priority = -19;
  pthread_setschedparam(t0.native_handle(), SCHED_FIFO, &sch);

  pthread_getschedparam(t1.native_handle(), &policy, &sch);
  sch.sched_priority = 18;
  pthread_setschedparam(t1.native_handle(), SCHED_FIFO, &sch);

  pthread_getschedparam(t2.native_handle(), &policy, &sch);
  sch.sched_priority = 18;
  pthread_setschedparam(t2.native_handle(), SCHED_FIFO, &sch);

  tw.join();
  t1.join();
  t0.join();
  t2.join();

  return 0;  
}
share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I can think of three methods using only threading primitives:

Triple mutex

Three mutexes would work here:

  • data mutex ('M')
  • next-to-access mutex ('N'), and
  • low-priority access mutex ('L')

Access patterns are:

  • Low-priority threads: lock L, lock N, lock M, unlock N, { do stuff }, unlock M, unlock L
  • High-priority thread: lock N, lock M, unlock N, { do stuff }, unlock M

That way the access to the data is protected, and the high-priority thread can get ahead of the low-priority threads in access to it.

Mutex, condition variable, atomic flag

The primitive way to do this is with a condition variable and an atomic:

  • Mutex M;
  • Condvar C;
  • atomic bool hpt_waiting;

Data access patterns:

  • Low-priority thread: lock M, while (hpt_waiting) wait C on M, { do stuff }, broadcast C, unlock M
  • High-priority thread: hpt_waiting := true, lock M, hpt_waiting := false, { do stuff }, broadcast C, unlock M

Mutex, condition variable, two non-atomic flag

Alternatively you can use two non-atomic bools with a condvar; in this technique the mutex/condvar protects the flags, and the data is protected not by a mutex but by a flag:

  • Mutex M;
  • Condvar C;
  • bool data_held, hpt_waiting;

  • Low-priority thread: lock M, while (hpt_waiting or data_held) wait C on M, data_held := true, unlock M, { do stuff }, lock M, data_held := false, broadcast C, unlock M

  • High-priority thread: lock M, hpt_waiting := true, while (data_held) wait C on M, data_held := true, { do stuff }, lock M, data_held := false, hpt_waiting := false, broadcast C, unlock M
share|improve this answer
    
Both ways (ecatmur and Martin James) will work. The 3 mutex way is simpler and much more easier to implement, just done it and it works. The priority queue is much more flexible but needs more attention in coding it, and so I will implement it only if i need specific features. –  d3k Jul 27 '12 at 0:02
    
Of the 3 ecatmur ways, I'd prefer to go with the third (more intuitive) but in my implementation resulted in a freezed process (deadlock I suppose). I think it's my fault in implementing condvar, but not sure. Anyway, the first one worked like a breeze. –  d3k Jul 27 '12 at 0:09

Put requesting threads on a 'priority queue'. The privileged thread can get first go at the data when it's free.

One way to do this would be withan array of ConcurrentQueues[privilegeLevel], a lock and some events.

Any thread that wants at the data enters the lock. If the data is free, (boolean), it gets the data object and exits the lock. If the data is in use by another thread, the requesting thread pushes an event onto one of the concurrent queues, depending on its privilege level, exits the lock and waits on the event.

When a thread wants to release its ownership of the data object, it gets the lock and iterates the array of ConcurrentQueues from the highest-privilege end down, looking for an event, (ie queue count>0). If it finds one, it signals it and exits the lock, if not, it sets the 'dataFree' boolean and and exits the lock.

When a thread waiting on an event for access to the data is made ready, it may access the data object.

I thnk that should work. Please, other developers, check this design and see if you can think of any races etc? I'm still suffering somewhat from 'hospitality overload' after a trip to CZ..

Edit - probably don't even need concurrent queues because of the explicit lock across them all. Any old queue would do.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this solution, it's quite simple and elegant, and allows for future expansions (different prioritites, for example). Sorry for newbie question: what would you use for thread signalling? a condition variable? standard unix signals? –  d3k Jul 26 '12 at 12:47
    
@d3k Well, on Windows, (which I am more familiar with), an AutoRestEvent would do, either as a data member of a thread class or actually allocated inside this 'PrivilegeQueue' class. You could even store 'spare' ARE in another queue to save continually making system calls to create them. On Linux, I guess a condvar would do, or a sema - anything that can be waited on by one thread and signaled by another. –  Martin James Jul 26 '12 at 14:29
    
@d3k - you're correct in thinking a condvar would be the way to do it. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 14:48
    
@Flexo - is it expensive to create a condvar? Would it be a reasonable optimization to 'pool' left-over condvars in a queue for use by later threads as and when they turn up? Just curious in case I ever want to do this myself. –  Martin James Jul 26 '12 at 15:35
    
@MartinJames - I'd use just one condvar for the "low priority" clients to sleep on, you can ask for just one to be awoken like that. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 15:37

On linux you can check this man: pthread_setschedparam and also man sched_setscheduler

pthread_setschedparam(pthread_t thread, int policy, const struct sched_param *param);

Check this also for c++2011: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.thread.priority.aspx#Y78

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please elaborate on how setting the schduling priority will help the real-time thread go first on the shared access? –  RedX Jul 26 '12 at 11:12
    
@RedX What does the scheduling priority if not the "go first after synchronization point"? –  Dmitry Poroh Jul 26 '12 at 22:15

Try something like the following. You could make the class a thread-safe singleton and you could even make it a functor.

#include <pthread.h>
#include <semaphore.h>
#include <map>

class ThreadPrioFun
{
    typedef std::multimap<int, sem_t*> priomap_t;
public:
    ThreadPrioFun()
    {
        pthread_mutex_init(&mtx, NULL);
    }
    ~ThreadPrioFun()
    {
        pthread_mutex_destroy(&mtx);
    }
    void fun(int prio, sem_t* pSem)
    {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);
        bool bWait = !(pm.empty());
        priomap_t::iterator it = pm.insert(std::pair<int, sem_t*>(prio, pSem) );
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);

        if( bWait ) sem_wait(pSem);

        // do the actual job
        // ....
        //

        pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);
        // done, remove yourself
        pm.erase(it);
        if( ! pm.empty() )
        {
             // let next guy run:
            sem_post((pm.begin()->second));
        }
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);
    }
private:
    pthread_mutex_t mtx;
    priomap_t pm;
};
share|improve this answer
    
I got your idea, but I didnt manage to create a thread from your class... my fault (lack of knowledge...): –  d3k Jul 26 '12 at 15:46
    
main(){ ThreadPrioFun p; sem_t* s; std::thread t1(p.fun,1,s); std::thread t2(p.fun,2,s); std::thread t0(p.fun,0,s); std::thread t3(p.fun,3,s); t1.join(); t2.join(); t0.join(); t3.join(); –  d3k Jul 26 '12 at 15:47
    
gives: test2.cpp:60:26: error: no matching function for call to ‘std::thread::thread(<unresolved overloaded function type>, int, sem_t*&)’ –  d3k Jul 26 '12 at 15:50
    
Member function pointers cannot be passed as function pointer parameters. Wrap it into a standalone function and pass to it the pointer to ThreadPrioFun, prio integer and the pointer to the semaphore and call the member function from within. Although the solution with three mutexes posted by ecatmur above seems much better. –  Claudiu Attila Balogh Jul 26 '12 at 16:56
    
Ok, managed to get it working wrapping into myfun(int,sem_t*,ThreadPriofun*), but as you wrote i prefer the other solution, maybe simpler to work with –  d3k Jul 26 '12 at 21:48

pthreads has thread priorities:

pthread_setschedprio( (pthread_t*)(&mThreadId), wpri );

If multiple threads are sleeping waiting in a lock, the scheduler will wake the highest priority thread first.

share|improve this answer
    
tried but does not work –  d3k Jul 26 '12 at 15:01

Since thread priorities isn't working for you:

Create 2 mutexes, a regular lock and a priority lock.

Regular threads must first lock the normal lock, and then the priority lock. The priority thread only has to lock the priority lock:

Mutex mLock;
Mutex mPriLock;


doNormal()
{
   mLock.lock();
   pthread_yield();
   doPriority();
   mLock.unlock();
}

doPriority()
{
   mPriLock.lock();
   doStuff();
   mPriLock.unlock();
}
share|improve this answer
    
That still leave your "priority" thread only a 50-50 chance of getting it every time the lock becomes available. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 15:40
    
No. Say you have 5 low priority threads waiting on mLock, and one low pri thread in doStuff. Along comes the hi pri thread and it locks mPriLock. Now it is waiting on the current thread in doStuff. That thread finishes and unlocks mPriLock - now the hi-pri thread's lock on mPriLock succeeds. The low pri threads are waiting on mLock that gets unlocked second. –  Rafael Baptista Jul 26 '12 at 15:45
    
There's no guarantee that the high priority thread can take the one lock before a low priority thread can take both. Imagine on a single CPU machine where a low priority process has it and all the other processes are waiting. All threads are currently blocked except the running low prio on. If the timeslices are coarse enough (there's no reason for them not to be) then the releasing of both locks by the current holder happens in at once. The set of runnable threads is now all threads, whichever thread, high or low priority gets the next chunk of CPU they will get the lock. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 15:52
    
Just because one thread is in a runnable state before another doesn't mean it will get run first. You guarantee that the high priority thread is the first one to become runnable, but not that it is the only one runnable next time a context swap happens or that it is the first to make progress. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 15:54
1  
yield never fixes anything. It's nothing more than an optimisation that might tweak probabilities but not enforce any rules, or change any overall characteristics. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 16:10

Modified slightly ecatmur answer, adding a 4th mutex to handle multiple high priority threads contemporaneously (note that this was not required in my original question):

#include <thread>
#include <iostream>
#include "unistd.h"

std::mutex M; //data access mutex
std::mutex N; // 'next to access' mutex
std::mutex L; //low priority access mutex
std::mutex H; //hptwaiting int access mutex

int hptwaiting=0;

void lowpriolock(){
  L.lock();
  while(hptwaiting>0){
    N.lock();
    N.unlock();
  }
  N.lock();
  M.lock();
  N.unlock();
}

void lowpriounlock(){
  M.unlock();
  L.unlock();
}

void highpriolock(){
  H.lock();
  hptwaiting++;
  H.unlock();
  N.lock();
  M.lock();
  N.unlock();
}

void highpriounlock(){
  M.unlock();
  H.lock();
  hptwaiting--;
  H.unlock();
}

void hpt(const char* s){
  using namespace std;
  //cout << "hpt trying to get lock here" << endl;
  highpriolock();
  cout << s << endl;
  usleep(30000);
  highpriounlock();
}

void lpt(const char* s){
  using namespace std;
  //cout << "lpt trying to get lock here" << endl;
  lowpriolock();
  cout << s << endl;
  usleep(30000);
  lowpriounlock();
}

int main(){
std::thread t0(lpt,"low  prio t0  working here");
std::thread t1(lpt,"low  prio t1  working here");
std::thread t2(hpt,"high prio t2  working here");
std::thread t3(lpt,"low  prio t3  working here");
std::thread t4(lpt,"low  prio t4  working here");
std::thread t5(lpt,"low  prio t5  working here");
std::thread t6(hpt,"high prio t6  working here");
std::thread t7(lpt,"low  prio t7  working here");
std::thread t8(hpt,"high prio t8  working here");
std::thread t9(lpt,"low  prio t9  working here");
std::thread t10(lpt,"low  prio t10 working here");
std::thread t11(lpt,"low  prio t11 working here");
std::thread t12(hpt,"high prio t12 working here");
std::thread t13(lpt,"low  prio t13 working here");
//std::cout << "All threads created" << std::endl;
t0.join();
t1.join();
t2.join();
t3.join();
t4.join();
t5.join();
t6.join();
t7.join();
t8.join();
t9.join();
t10.join();
t11.join();
t12.join();
t13.join();
return 0;
}

What do you think? Is it ok? It's true that a semaphore could handle better this kind of thing, but mutexes are much more easy to manage to me.

share|improve this answer
#include <thread>
#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <cassert>

class priority_mutex {
  std::condition_variable cv_;
  std::mutex gate_;
  bool locked_;
  std::thread::id pr_tid_; // priority thread
public:
  priority_mutex() : locked_(false) {}
  ~priority_mutex() { assert(!locked_); }
  priority_mutex(priority_mutex&) = delete;
  priority_mutex operator=(priority_mutex&) = delete;

  void lock(bool privileged = false) {
    const std::thread::id tid = std::this_thread::get_id();
    std::unique_lock<decltype(gate_)> lk(gate_);
    if (privileged)
      pr_tid_ = tid;
    cv_.wait(lk, [&]{
      return !locked_ && (pr_tid_ == std::thread::id() || pr_tid_ == tid);
    });
    locked_ = true;
  }

  void unlock() {
    std::lock_guard<decltype(gate_)> lk(gate_);
    if (pr_tid_ == std::this_thread::get_id())
      pr_tid_ = std::thread::id();
    locked_ = false;
    cv_.notify_all();
  }
};

NOTICE: This priority_mutex provides unfair thread scheduling. If privileged thread acquires the lock frequently, other non-privileged threads may almost not scheduled.

Usage example:

#include <mutex>
priority_mutex mtx;

void privileged_thread()
{
  //...
  {
    mtx.lock(true);  // acquire 'priority lock'
    std::unique_lock<decltype(mtx)> lk(mtx, std::adopt_lock);
    // update shared state, etc.
  }
  //...
}

void normal_thread()
{
  //...
  {
    std::unique_lock<decltype(mtx)> lk(mtx);  // acquire 'normal lock'
    // do something
  }
  //...
}
share|improve this answer

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