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class A {
    public:
        A();
    private:
        pthread_mutex_t mu;
};

A::A()
{
    mu = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;  //cannot compile
}

Can't I initialize pthread_mutex_t inside a class member function?

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1  
What you show is an assignment not an initialization. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 9:54
    
@Flexo, OOPS, sorry. –  Alcott Jul 26 '12 at 9:56
    
No need to apologise! –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 9:58

3 Answers 3

Use pthread_mutex_init in this case, as the constant is for compile-time initialization.

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Only for static pthread_mutex_t? –  Alcott Jul 26 '12 at 9:57
    
Then I cannot put pthread_mutex_t data member in the initializtion list, can I? –  Alcott Jul 26 '12 at 9:58
    
Sorry, I meant compile-time initialization, not static initialization. And yes, you cannot put it either (at least if not in C++11) in initialization lists. –  Diego Sevilla Jul 26 '12 at 10:03

Instead of this:

A::A()
{
    mu = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;  //cannot compile
}

Try this:

A::A()
{
pthread_mutex_init( &(mu), NULL);
}

The PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER is a macro,a C struct initializer for something like {0,0,0,0,0{0}} and can only be used at the point of definition.

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Even if we change this to use an initializer list in the constructor it still fails:

#include <pthread.h>

struct foo {
  pthread_mutex_t test;
  foo() : test(PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER) {}
};

int main() {
  foo f;
}

We can see why it fails and an only be used for initialisation in a few contexts by looking at the output from the pre-processsor:

struct foo {
  pthread_mutex_t test;
  foo() : test({ { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, { 0 } } }) {}
};

It's not legal to use nested braces for initialisation like that in C++03, but what's more interesting perhaps is that C++11 makes this syntax and usage perfectly legal.

In your original code we can see a few more things:

A::A()
{
    const pthread_mutex_t test = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER; //  initialization - fine
    mu = test; // assignment - fine
    mu = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;  // assignment - C++11 only
}
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Then why my code in the OP cannot compile? –  Alcott Jul 26 '12 at 10:06
    
The original code is legal C++11 also, probably you don't have C++11 support enabled in your compiler. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 10:08
    
There are so many c++ stds, I feel kind of confused. –  Alcott Jul 26 '12 at 10:09
    
@Alcott there are only 3 major versions of the standard - don't mix compiler versions from a specific vendor with standard versions. –  Flexo Jul 26 '12 at 10:10

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