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How can i process text in numpy arrays elegantly?

I can always iterate over the array, but is there some magic oneliner also possible? I am just learning python and want to do it in a way that looks good also.

example of what i want:

for y in data['filename']:
first = 12
last  = y[1][12:].find('.')
y= y[1][first+1:last+12]
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2  
NumPy isn't for string processing. In fact, it's very inefficient at storing variable-length strings. You might want to do this in pure Python instead. –  larsmans Jul 26 '12 at 11:51
    
actually, is it even possible to store variable-length strings ? –  François Jul 26 '12 at 17:04
    
@François - As an object array, yes. (Though, at that point, you're better off with a list.) –  Joe Kington May 12 '13 at 17:03
    
@tarrasch - Have a look at os.path.splitext if you're trying to strip the extension off of filenames. (Similarly, have a look at all of os.path if you're dealing with filenames/paths.) As larsmans suggested, for dealing with strings in numpy arrays, just treat them like they were lists and iterate through. numpy deliberately doesn't provide vectorized string operations. –  Joe Kington May 12 '13 at 17:11
    
@tarrasch did you check the answers below? –  Saullo Castro May 24 at 6:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use a numpy.char.array(), for example:

from string import find

import numpy as np

a = np.char.array(['cmd.py', 'matrix.txt', 'print.txt', 'test.txt', 'testpickle.test', 'Thumbs.db', 'tmp.py', 'tmp.txt', 'tmp2.py'])
find(a, '.py')
#array([ 3, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,  3, -1,  4])


np.char.array(a.split('.'))[:,0]
#chararray(['cmd', 'matrix', 'print', 'test', 'testpickle', 'Thumbs', 'tmp', 'tmp', 'tmp2'], dtype='|S10')
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