Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hi I want to select a group of values conditioned on a value in a data table.

Specifically I would like to select all columns grouped by date and id for all Positive values where e == 1

   id   date     e       logret 
   7 2011-07-29  1   -0.0272275211      
   7 2011-07-29  2    0.0034229025      
   7 2011-07-29  3    0.0042622177      
   8 2011-07-29  1    0.0035662770      
   8 2011-07-29  2   -0.0015268474 
   8 2011-07-29  3    0.0013333333
   7 2011-07-30  1    0.0044444444      
   7 2011-07-30  2   -0.0001111111 
   7 2011-07-30  3    0.0013333333

here all elements for id 8 and date 2011-07-29 and all elements of id 7 for date 2011-07-30 will be selected since the logret for e == 1 is > 0 where as all elements of id 7 on 2011-07-29 are ignored since the first logret (where e==1) is < 0

Ans:

   8 2011-07-29  1    0.0035662770      
   8 2011-07-29  2   -0.0015268474 
   8 2011-07-29  3    0.0013333333
   7 2011-07-30  1    0.0044444444      
   7 2011-07-30  2   -0.0001111111 
   7 2011-07-30  3    0.0013333333    

in sql I'd use some kind of subselect to achieve this. I would :

1) Select the id and date where e=1 and logret > 0
2) Select * join on results of subselect

I think data.table can do this as well, but I'm finding it tricky to express it in data.table terms. Specifically, I can replicate step 1, but can't do the join part in step 2.

pos <- DT[e==1][logret > 0]

But can't join the pos values back into my DT

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

It's not pretty, and it's not in data.table, but this seems like it would work:

# Recreate your data
df = read.table(header=TRUE, text="id   date    e       logret 
    7 2011-07-29 1   -0.0272275211      
    7 2011-07-29 2    0.0034229025      
    7 2011-07-29 2    0.0042622177      
    8 2011-07-29 1    0.0035662770      
    8 2011-07-29 2   -0.0015268474 
    8 2011-07-29 3    0.0013333333")
df[which(df$id != df$id[which(df$e == 1 & df$logret < 0)]),]
#   id       date e       logret
# 4  8 2011-07-29 1  0.003566277
# 5  8 2011-07-29 2 -0.001526847
# 6  8 2011-07-29 3  0.001333333
#
## Or the equivalent in "positive" terms
#
# df[which(df$id == df$id[which(df$e == 1 & df$logret > 0)]),]

Update based on comments and new sample data

Just off the top of my head (I have not had any experience with the data.table package; it's on my "to learn" list). Here's a possible solution:

temp = split(df, df$date)
lapply(temp, 
       function(x) 
         x[which(x$id == x$id[which(x$e == 1 & x$logret > 0)]),])
# $`2011-07-29`
#   id       date e       logret
# 4  8 2011-07-29 1  0.003566277
# 5  8 2011-07-29 2 -0.001526847
# 6  8 2011-07-29 3  0.001333333
# 
# $`2011-07-30`
#   id       date e        logret
# 7  7 2011-07-30 1  0.0044444444
# 8  7 2011-07-30 2 -0.0001111111
# 9  7 2011-07-30 3  0.0013333333

Update 2

It is also worth trying merge:

merge(df, df[which(df$e == 1 & df$logret > 0), c(1, 2)])
#   id       date e        logret
# 1  7 2011-07-30 1  0.0044444444
# 2  7 2011-07-30 2 -0.0001111111
# 3  7 2011-07-30 3  0.0013333333
# 4  8 2011-07-29 1  0.0035662770
# 5  8 2011-07-29 2 -0.0015268474
# 6  8 2011-07-29 3  0.0013333333
share|improve this answer
    
As an aside, the above method doesnt factor in the grouping by date. For instance if I had two dates with the same id and if one had a positive return for e==1 and one had a negative return for e==1, it would still include both dates. –  user1480926 Jul 26 '12 at 12:11
    
Added some data where you can clearly see the above solution doesnt work since it only selects id 8. –  user1480926 Jul 26 '12 at 12:25
    
@user1480926, I'll explore the data.table package if I have some time, but I've added a temporary possible solution to the limitation you identified. It's easy to put this back into a single data frame too, if you prefer that format. –  Ananda Mahto Jul 26 '12 at 13:25
    
Thank you @mrdwab for your help. I think I have solved this using data.table (see below). I got the hint / intuition looking at your solution. –  user1480926 Jul 26 '12 at 13:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have solved it in a round about way :

pos <- DT[e==1][logret > 0, list(id,date)]
ans <- DT[J(pos$id,pos$date)];

would be interested to hear any more elegant 1 line ways to do it in data.table.


EDIT from Matthew :

If key(DT) is already (id,date) then a one liner would be :

DT[DT[e==1 & logret>0, list(id,date)]]

and that should be faster, too. If you can rely on id and date being the first 2 columns of DT, then it can be shortened to :

DT[DT[e==1 & logret>0]]
share|improve this answer
1  
It seems like you've found an efficient way to do this. I assume that you've set id and date as your key. "Reverse compiling" from this, I also offer you another base R solution (just for fun): merge(df, df[which(df$e == 1 & df$logret > 0), c(1, 2)]). –  Ananda Mahto Jul 26 '12 at 15:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.