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I have Maven a pom.xml file (copied from another project, and adapted), and I would like to generate the directory structure for a new project. Which command can do this?

Note that I found countless examples on the web, that explained how to use mvn archetype:create to create a pom.xml file and the directory structure, but I already have a pom.xml, and I would like to create the directories based on that, without specifying groupId, artifactId etc on the command line.

mvn archetype:create-from-project also seems to create a pom.xml based on another pom.xml (?) but I just want the directories. Thank you in advance!

EDIT: I am aware that this is not a "big problem" because I can create the directories manually :) I did it already many times, and I always felt that there must be a smarter way to do it...

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I use an IDE to build the project structure. It generates the maven poml. from a template and the directories required. It also sets the parent pom when adding modules. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 26 '12 at 12:02
    
I use Idea, and after "New Project" I select import from Maven. This set up the pom.xml and the libraries, but did not create the maven-speciofic directory structure. –  lbalazscs Jul 26 '12 at 12:20
    
It only creates the directories if you use it to create the pom.xml as well. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 26 '12 at 12:34
    
Yes, if I use Idea to create a new project with a "maven module", then it creates the directories, but then I have to specify the groupId, artifactId myself (and copy manually all the dependencies and settings), so this is not easier than mvn archetype:create. –  lbalazscs Jul 26 '12 at 12:54
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The problem is that it is not different... Creating archetypes seems overkill to me... I would like more than a solution, I would like a simple solution :) –  lbalazscs Jul 26 '12 at 13:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not to sound condescending, but:

mkdir -p src/main/java
mkdir -p src/main/resources
mkdir -p src/test/java
mkdir -p src/test/resources

(or feel free to substitute different directories).

I don't know of any maven command that will create this structure for you without creating a new pom file.

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Yes, I thought of this solution (actually I did it already too many times) but could not believe that there is no maven-supported way... Suppose some non-standard directories are configured in pom.xml... Anyway, if there will be no better answers, I will accept this one :) –  lbalazscs Jul 26 '12 at 12:32
    
Not the answer I was hoping for, but it seems that there is no better one. –  lbalazscs Jul 27 '12 at 12:39
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this doesn't answer the question at all –  NimChimpsky Jan 16 '13 at 11:19
    
everyone will have to run the same four commands or create a script to do it ... when the whole point of maven is to automate the build process/project structure. –  NimChimpsky Jan 16 '13 at 13:57
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Or the following mkdir: mkdir -p src/{main,test}/{java,resources} –  HankCa Mar 19 at 1:34

I agree that there should be a way to specify that maven itself should look at my pom and generate a project/dir structure from that. I don't know of a way to do that, but here's what I do:

Step 1: move your already created pom.xml somewhere else (maven will complain if you already have it in the directory where you will run the next command)

Step 2: from the command line, in your new maven project directory execute:

mvn archetype:generate -DarchetypeArtifactId=maven-archetype-quickstart -DinteractiveMode=false -DgroupId=my.package.path -DartifactId=myartifact

You do have to edit groupId and artifactId to match your pom (sigh), but this creates the basic directory structure for you and a default Java class and Unit test.

Step 3: move/copy your pom.xml into that project directory

Step 4: run some maven command like mvn clean package or mvn dependency:tree to start downloading dependencies

Note: I'm including this answer because some of the previous answers recommend using mvn archetype:create, but according to the maven website that goal is deprecated in favor of using generate. And I wanted to show how to do it independent of any IDE or IDE plugins.

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+1 for a soul mate who thinks that maven should be able to do this if it has all the necessary information :) However this solution is not simpler than creating/using a small batch script, which I did at the end... –  lbalazscs Aug 6 '12 at 16:00
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@lbalazscs +1 also, I think this is lame too. I have a pom, I want it to create everything from scratch without an tricks (such as a batch file, good idea btw) –  NimChimpsky Jan 16 '13 at 11:18

It seems to me like you are making a big problem out of a little one.

I'd try using mvn archetype:create-from-project ... and then just replace the generated POM file with the original one.

And as Peter Lawrey suggests, a lot of modern IDEs are capable of creating a Maven project structure.

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Oh no, mvn archetype:create-from-project is a multi-step process in itself (see maven.apache.org/archetype/maven-archetype-plugin/…), with a lot of directory-changing, copy, multiple maven commands. It semes to me that even creating directories manually is easier than that... –  lbalazscs Jul 26 '12 at 12:24
    
What about mvn archetype:create and replace the POM file then? Or just use mkdir? Or writing a simple shell script that does a sequence of mkdirs? –  Stephen C Jul 26 '12 at 12:38
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Basically I am looking for something that is easier than manually creating directories. I just couldn't believe that there is no automated way. –  lbalazscs Jul 26 '12 at 12:44
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the whole point of maven is too have standardized project structure and build process. Its great in general, but I think it should also be able to create the directory strcutre from an existing pom –  NimChimpsky Jan 16 '13 at 11:20
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@NimChimpsky - Feel free to work out how to do it and contribute the code to the Maven project ... –  Stephen C Jan 16 '13 at 14:37

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