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I am trying to understand the underlying design of boost shared_ptr class. I want to "port" it to fortran (don't ask). One thing I understand is that the reference count is held by a shared_count class. This prompts me a question. I haven't used C++ since a long time, and never used boost.

Suppose I allocate a single instance of a class X, then pass it to two different shared_ptr instances. From what I understand, each shared_ptr instance does not know anything about the other, hence both shared_ptr instances are referring to the same X instance, while keeping a refcount of 1. if one shared_ptr goes out of scope while the other doesn't, the X object will be deleted (as the refcount drops to zero) and the remaining shared_ptr will have a dangling pointer. In order to keep the shared_ptr refcount, you have to create a shared_ptr from another shared_ptr.

Am I right ? If not, how can boost keep track of which shared_ptrs are referencing a class that knows nothing about the fact that is being referenced through shared_ptrs ?

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Not to attempt to deter you from asking this question or gathering the input of smart people who can explain it with words, but you do know that the Boost libraries are open-source, right? So you can check the implementation for yourself. –  Cody Gray Jul 26 '12 at 12:28
1  
@Cody: that's what I am doing, but checking the sources of a complex library in a language I am extremely rusty in without knowing how it works is not something I do in 5 minutes. Actually, if someone could provide some snippet that shows me that indeed what I think is correct, I would learn something about boost, and refresh my C++. –  Stefano Borini Jul 26 '12 at 12:29
1  
You are right. The only way to solve this "issue" is to store the reference count in the object itself (see intrusive_ptr). –  Luc Touraille Jul 26 '12 at 12:29
1  
@Luc No, that is definitely not the only way (e.g. having a central dictionary of pointers and their reference counter, or using a classical garbage collector). –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 26 '12 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Basically you're right. Your example will result in dangling pointer (note that there are some exceptions if you use boost::enable_shared_from_this as base class).

Explanation

Problem

boost:shared_ptr and std::shared_ptr share the same idea: create a smart pointer with a reference count from a raw pointer. However, they also share the same problem that all smart pointer have: if you use the raw pointer in another smart pointer which isn't associated to your other smart pointer, you'll end with dangling pointers and multiple calls of delete:

int * ptr = new int;
{
    std::shared_ptr<int> shared1(ptr); // initialise a new ref_count = 1
    {
        std::shared_ptr<int> shared2(ptr);  // initialise a new ref_count = 1
    } // first call of delete, since shared2.use_count() == 0
} // second call of delete, since shared1.use_count() == 0. ooops

"Solution"

After you created your first smart pointer S from a raw pointer p to an object O you should only use copy constructors with S, not with p, as long as O isn't a derivate from std::enable_shared_from_this. boost has a somewhat equivalent of this, but mixing raw pointer and smart pointer is still a bad idea. Even better - don't use raw pointer if you work with smart pointer:

std::shared_ptr<int> ptr(new int);
{
    std::shared_ptr<int> shared1(ptr); // ptr.use_count() == 2
    {
        std::shared_ptr<int> shared2(ptr);  // ptr.use_count()  = 3
    } // ptr.use_count()  = 2
}  // ptr.use_count()  = 1

Even better, don't allocate the memory yourself but use std::make_shared or boost:make_shared:

std::shared_ptr<int> ptr = std::make_shared<int>();
{
    std::shared_ptr<int> shared1(ptr); // ptr.use_count() == 2
    {
        std::shared_ptr<int> shared2(ptr);  // ptr.use_count() == 3
    } // ptr.use_count() == 2
}  // ptr.use_count() == 1

Possible implementation

The following implementation is very crude compared to the std::shared_ptr, as it doesn't support std::weak_ptr and std::enable_shared_from_this. However, it should give you an overview how to handle a shared pointer:

//!\brief Base clase for reference counter
class reference_base{
    reference_base(const reference_base&);                            // not copyable
    reference_base& operator=(const reference_base &){return *this;}// not assignable    

protected:
    size_t ref_count; //!< reference counter
    virtual void dispose() = 0; //!< pure virtual
public:    
    //! initialize with a single reference count
    reference_base() : ref_count(1){}

    //! returns the current count of references
    size_t use_count() const{
        return ref_count;
    }

    //! increases the current count of references
    void increase(){
        ref_count++;
    }

    //! decreases the current count of references and dispose if the counter drops to zero
    void decrease(){
        if(--ref_count == 0)
            dispose();
    }
};

//! \brief Specialized version for pointer
template <class T>
class reference_base_ptr : public reference_base{
    typedef T* pointer_type;
protected:
    //! uses delete to deallocate memory
    virtual void dispose(){
        delete ptr;
        ptr = 0;
    }
public:
    reference_base_ptr(T * ptr) : ptr(ptr){}
    pointer_type ptr;
};

//! \brief Specialized version for arrays
template <class T>
class reference_base_range : public reference_base{
    typedef T* pointer_type;

protected:
    virtual void dispose(){
        delete[] ptr;
        ptr = 0;
    }
public:
    reference_base_range(T * ptr) : ptr(ptr){}
    pointer_type ptr;
};

/***********************************************************/

//! base class for shared memory
template <class T, class reference_base_type>
class shared_memory{
    public:
        typedef T element_type;

        //! Standard constructor, points to null
        shared_memory() : reference_counter(new reference_base_type(0)){}

        //! Constructs the shared_memroy and creates a new reference_base
        template<class Y> shared_memory(Y * ptr){
            try{
                reference_counter = new reference_base_type(ptr);
            }catch(std::bad_alloc &e){
                delete ptr;
                throw;
            }
        }
        //! Copies the shared_memory and increases the reference count
        shared_memory(const shared_memory & o) throw() : reference_counter(o.reference_counter){
            o.reference_counter->increase();
        }

        //! Copies the shared_memory of another pointer type and increases the reference count.
        //! Needs the same reference_base_type
        template<class Y> 
        shared_memory(const shared_memory<Y,reference_base_type> & o) throw() : reference_counter(o.reference_counter){
            reference_counter->increase();
        }

        //! Destroys the shared_memory object and deletes the reference_counter if this was the last
        //! reference.        
        ~shared_memory(){
            reference_counter->decrease();
            if(reference_counter->use_count() == 0)
                delete reference_counter;
        }

        //! Returns the number of references
        size_t use_count() const{
            return reference_counter->use_count();
        }

        //! Returns a pointer to the refered memory
        T * get() const{
            return reference_counter->ptr;
        }

        //! Checks whether this object is unique
        bool unique() const{
            return use_count() == 1;
        }        

        //! Checks whehter this object is valid
        operator bool() const{
            return get() != 0;
        }

        //! Checks doesn't reference anythign
        bool empty() const{
            return get() == 0;
        }

        //! Assignment operator for derived classes
        template<class Y> 
        shared_memory& operator=(const shared_memory<Y,reference_base_type> & o){
            shared_memory<Y,reference_base_type> tmp(o);
            swap(tmp);
        }

        //! Assignment operator
        shared_memory& operator=(const shared_memory & o){
            shared_memory tmp(o);
            swap(tmp);
            return *this;
        }

        /** resets the ptr to NULL. If this was the last shared_memory object
        *   owning the referenced object, the object gets deleted.
        *   \sa ~shared_memory
        */
        void reset(){
            shared_memory tmp;
            swap(tmp);
        }

        /** releases the old object and takes a new one
        */
        template <class Y>
        void reset(Y * ptr){
            shared_memory tmp(ptr);
            swap(tmp);
        }        

        /** swaps the owned objects of two shared_memory objects.
        */
        void swap(shared_memory & r){
            reference_base_type * tmp = reference_counter;
            reference_counter = r.reference_counter;
            r.reference_counter = tmp;
        }

    protected:        
        reference_base_type * reference_counter;    //!< Actually reference counter and raw pointer
};

/***********************************************************/

//! ptr (single object) specialization
template <class T>
class shared_ptr : public shared_memory<T,reference_base_ptr<T> >{
    typedef reference_base_ptr<T> reference_counter_type;
    typedef shared_memory<T,reference_counter_type> super;
    typedef T element_type;
public:
    shared_ptr(){}
    template<class Y> shared_ptr(Y * ptr){
        try{
            super::reference_counter = new reference_counter_type(ptr);
        }catch(std::bad_alloc &e){
            //couldn't allocated memory for reference counter
            delete ptr; // prevent memory leak
            throw bad_alloc();
        }
    }
    element_type & operator*() const{
        return *(super::reference_counter->ptr);
    }
    element_type * operator->() const{
        return super::reference_counter->ptr;
    }
};

/***********************************************************/

//! array (range) specialization
template <class T>
class shared_array : public shared_memory<T,reference_base_range<T> >{
    typedef reference_base_range<T> reference_counter_type;
    typedef shared_memory<T,reference_counter_type> super;
    typedef T element_type;

public:
    shared_array(){}
    template<class Y> shared_array(Y * ptr){
        try{
            super::reference_counter = new reference_counter_type(ptr);
        }catch(std::bad_alloc &e){
            delete[] ptr;
            throw bad_alloc();
        }
    }
    element_type & operator[](int i) const{
        return *(super::reference_counter->ptr + i);
    }
};

See also:

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It's the current implementation of boost::shared_ptr<X>, but others can be thought of which do not share this disadvantage. E.g. a static std::unordered_map<X*, int> std::shared_ptr<X>::share_count can be used to keep track of the amount of shared_ptr<X> pointers to each X. However, the downside of this is a far larger overhead than a simple share count.

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