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I would like to extract an interface of a class that needs initilization.

public class Example<T>
{
    public Example(SomeData data)
    {
        // initialize self with data
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> GetObjects(SomeData data)
    {
        // extract data
    }
}

The problem is that we can't write an interface that would enforce non-default type constructors. I could of course change my class to:

public interface IExample<T>
{
    void Initilize(SomeData data);
    IEnumerable<T> GetObjects(SomeData data);
}

public class Example<T> : IExample<T>
{
    public void Initilize(SomeData data)
    {
        // initialize self with data
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> GetObjects(SomeData data)
    {
        // extract data
    }
}

But this is not the same, because when one would instantiate this type could directly call into GetObjects which would then result in an exception that instance is not initilized.

What other options do I have?

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4  
How about an abstract class to inherit from instead? –  J. Steen Jul 26 '12 at 13:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As this is just an interface, you shouldn't care about the constructor. The interface defines what the implementations can do but not specifically how they do it or what order methods are called in.

How can you realistically say that in the future there won't be some implementation of the interface that works differently and doesn't require the constructor?

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So are you saying that I should be throwing uninitialized exception in my particular class that does need initialization? –  Robert Koritnik Jul 26 '12 at 14:09
    
@RobertKoritnik No, he's saying that the interface shouldn't enforce that the class be initialized. It is up to the class implementing the interface to ensure that it is initialized if (and only if) it needs to be. –  Servy Jul 26 '12 at 14:23
    
@Robert Koritnik, the classes can still have a constructor, it's not enforced by the interface 'cause it's not relevant to the interface. This leaves you the flexibility to have some classes later that use a different interface. –  Samuel Neff Jul 26 '12 at 20:52
    
I know all that. The particularity of my class is such that initialization will always be needed whatever the implementation. All of my interface implemented classes will need initialization upon data retrieval. And it's only after initialization that they become useful. –  Robert Koritnik Jul 27 '12 at 8:50

You don't. The constructor arguments are an implementation detail of the class- they are irrelevant to the interface unless you decide to make GetObjects a read/write property.

Somewhere you are constructing a concrete instance, and you already know about the class itself there, so you know that you need to pass certain constructor arguments.

If you really want to enforce this idea that "All IExamples must be constructed with some arguments" externally, use a Factory pattern:

public static class ExampleFactory {
    public static IExample<T> MakeAnExample(SomeData data) {
        // return some concrete implementation... 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or maybe a builder pattern: sourcemaking.com/design_patterns/builder –  Slomo Jul 26 '12 at 13:56
    
@Slomo right- builder is basically a fancy factory. –  Chris Shain Jul 26 '12 at 13:57
    
Even if I do create a Factory/Builder that doesn't prevent developers to manually instantiate implementations of IExample<T>... Factory in this case would just be a wrapper of some sort... –  Robert Koritnik Jul 26 '12 at 14:12
    
@RobertKoritnik One standard practice would be that the factory, interface, and implementation are all in a class library. The actual implementations are internal while the factory and interface are public. Because of this (barring reflection) the concrete classes can only be created by going through the constructor. –  Servy Jul 26 '12 at 14:25
1  
If you don't want anyone external to your project to create an instance of this interface just make the constructors of the implementations internal. You can't stop an external party from implementing the interface themselves of course. –  Chris Shain Jul 26 '12 at 14:25

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