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I have a series of objects set along line represented by a LinkedHashMap<Foo, Double> where the first field is the object and the second field is its distance from the origin of measurement. I know that the elements are ordered by increasing distance. I want to be able to select some position x and search to the left and to the right for instances of Foo where foo.isInteresting() returns true without having to traverse the entire map.

My first idea is to do something like:

  • iterate over all entries to find first entry whose distance is greater than x
  • from this point look left at all entries until foo.isInteresting()
  • from this point look right at all entries until foo.isInteresting()

but as far as I know there is no way to iterate over a Map from a certain start point. Would it be sensible to create two List objects from my map and use ListIterator?

It is also not entirely sensible to swap the keys and values around as I need to search by Foo elsewhere in my application.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use TreeSet<Foo>, keep distance inside Foo and prepare a comparator. You can also create a wrapper object that contains Foo and distance and is comparable, and keep it in TreeSet<Wrapper>. Then you can use lower and higher methods of NavigableSet.

class Wrapper implements Comparable<Wrapper> {

    public Foo foo;
    public Double distance;

    public Wrapper(Foo foo, Double distance) {
        this.foo = foo;
        this.distance = distance;
    }

    /**
     * Use only Foo for hashcode and equals 
     */
    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + ((foo == null) ? 0 : foo.hashCode());
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        Wrapper other = (Wrapper) obj;
        if (foo == null) {
            if (other.foo != null)
                return false;
        } else if (!foo.equals(other.foo))
            return false;
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Wrapper o) {
        return distance.compareTo(o.distance);
    }

}@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    Wrapper other = (Wrapper) obj;
    if (foo == null) {
        if (other.foo != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!foo.equals(other.foo))
        return false;
    return true;
}

@Override
public int compareTo(Wrapper o) {
    return distance.compareTo(o.distance);
}

}

This lets you search by Foo and sort by distance.

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+1, I like this solution. lower() and higher() will only get you the two surrounding values. You could then recurse to iterate, but it would be M log N performance, where M is the number of items you want to look at. It might be easier to use subSet(). Also it's not strictly critical to keep the distance inside Foo, as long as your comparator knows how to get the distance given a Foo. –  Mark Peters Jul 26 '12 at 14:14
    
Custom comparator that lookups distance for a given Foo is a good idea. As for subSet I understood that we're looking for a nearest interesting foo left and right from a given foo. –  Piotr Gwiazda Jul 26 '12 at 14:27
    
I like this solution too. I think subSet() would be better to use, as the nearest interesting foo could be any distance away. I could iterate over a subSet() and break when I find the first interesting foo. –  fophillips Jul 26 '12 at 14:42
    
@Peter: Actually I see where you're coming from. I think the optimal iteration strategy would be (given "pos" is the Wrapper containing the desired point) to iterate over foos.tailSet(pos) and foos.descendingSet().tailSet(pos), alternating between them. –  Mark Peters Jul 26 '12 at 15:15
    
@Mark sure. This seems to be a good solution. –  Piotr Gwiazda Jul 27 '12 at 10:34

A navigablemap or treemap might be helpful instead, specifically tailmap and submap methods

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NavigableMap (e.g. TreeMap) uses natural ordering of keys, not values as in the example. This might be achieved with TreeMap<Double, List<Foo>> –  Piotr Gwiazda Jul 26 '12 at 14:03
    
Peter, it is not a problem to user custom comparator. –  AlexR Jul 26 '12 at 14:06
    
Yes, you can provide custom comparator but still for keys. In the example Foo is a key, which, as I understand, don't keep the distance. You'd need to put distance in Foo. See my answer. –  Piotr Gwiazda Jul 26 '12 at 14:10

I don't think a Map should be your data type of choice here. Instead, create an ArrayList<Foo> and sort it using the distance from origin as your comparator. Then, you can use Collections.binarySearch() to quickly find the closest index to your desired distance. Once you've done that, you can iterate over a specific set of values using List.subList().

A TreeSet (using TreeSet.subSet()) would work similarly, but you would need to make the Comparator a bit more complex because it would need to be able to compare Foos as a secondary comparison (for when the distance from origin is equal for two elements).

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Is it a so bad idea to work with two Map (simultaneously updated) :

LinkedHashMap<Foo, Double> basicMap;
SortedMap<Double, Set<Foo>> distMap; // may have same Double for two 'Foo's.

Edit to change in SortedMap

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You could use array[2][n] or two arrays[n], where first row is distance value and second is your object. So, you would be able to sort it according to distance and use binary search. When you'll find element with needed distance you will be able to traverse to the left or to the right.

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That was my original idea I outlined in my question, but I prefer Lists over arrays. –  fophillips Jul 28 '12 at 10:35

Consider indexed-tree-map , you will be able to access elements by index and get index of elements while keeping the sort order. Duplicates can be put into arrays as values under the same key.

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