Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to take my first steps into IPC and the WCF, and so far, I'm falling flat on my face. I have a Winforms application that I would like to instrument somewhat for remote callers. The winforms application has most of its business logic confined to a singleton that takes care of all the background work. I would like to expose some of the functionality through an IPC mechanism. WCF seems like the way forward, so I started out with that.

What I tried is adding a WCF Service Library project to my solution, through which I would like to expose some calls. When I start the Winforms project in the VS debugger, it runs as normal, and the WcfSvcHost starts up. I can communicate to the WCF service with the WcfTestClient.

However, when I try to access the singleton holding the code I would like to communicate with, it seems like I am getting a new singleton object. Clearly, I'm doing it wrong; what I guess is happening is that the service runs in a different process, so there is no real shared code, and hence no shared singleton.

I'm not sure how I should continue. Is my choice of using WCF for IPC the wrong one? Should I integrate the WCF endpoints in the Winforms application? Is what I'm trying even feasible?

EDIT: I figured this was so high-level, and also so simple that any code sample would be useless. I think I was wrong. So some code:

In the WinForms assembly:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
  public Form1()
    {
      InitializeComponent();
      label1.Text = MySingleton.Instance.InitedAt.ToString();
    }
}

public class MySingleton
{
  private static MySingleton instance = new MySingleton();
  private DateTime inited;

  private MySingleton()
  {
    this.inited = DateTime.Now;
  }

  public static MySingleton Instance
  {
    get
    {
      return instance;
    }
  }

  public DateTime InitedAt
  {
    get
    {
      return this.inited;
    }
  }
}

In the WCFServiceLibrary assembly:

[ServiceContract]
public interface IApplicationProbe {

  [OperationContract]
  string DoesItWork();

  [OperationContract]
  string SingletonInited();
}

public class ApplicationProbe : IApplicationProbe {
  public string DoesItWork(){
    return "Why yes, yes it does";
  }

  public string SingletonInited(){
    return MySingleton.Instance.InitedAt.ToString();
  }
}

when I query SingletonInited through the WcfTestClient, I get an InitedAt which is not the same DateTime as the instatiation of the winforms singleton.

Edit2:

I have this code running as is (with the auto-generated scaffolding around the Winforms stuff). The label on the form displays a different time than the time returned from the WCF call, demonstrating it is a different instance.

share|improve this question
    
IPC with WCF is usually done with named pipes. It's certainly supported; but there's lots of overhead. There's much more performant ways of doing IPC other than WCF. Memory-mapped files, for example. –  Peter Ritchie Jul 26 '12 at 15:50
    
Did you mean WCF instead of WPF? This is a first setup: First get it to work, then get it to work efficiently. Since I can't get the first step to work just yet, I haven't come around to the second yet, but I figured Named Pipes would be a good candidate. I'll look in to memory mapped files, thanks for the suggestion. –  Martijn Jul 26 '12 at 15:52
    
Yes, WCF, not WPF... autocorrect :) –  Peter Ritchie Jul 26 '12 at 15:53
    
Since this is not primarily about large amouts of data exchange, but more about letting the application on the other side do some amount of lifting/work, MMFs bare metal style seems less suitable than the more managed/typesafe WCF for me. –  Martijn Jul 26 '12 at 16:03

2 Answers 2

I assume you're using your singleton class as a service (it implements a contract). I suggest you develop a WCF contract and a service, which will make calls to your singleton instead.

So you'll have something like this:

public class YourImpportantSingleton
{
    public YourImpportantSingleton Instance { get; set; }
    public void DoSeriousBusiness(){...}
}

[ServiceContract]
public interface IYourContract
{
    void YourRemoteAction();
} 

public class YourService : IYourContract
{
    public void YourRemoteAction()
    {
        YourImportantSingleton.Instance.DoSeriousBusiness();
    }
}

UPD: Ok, just realized, that you might not be using self-hosting in a winforms application, sorry for that waste of time.

Your options would be then either host a service with ServiceHost in your forms application or host a service separately (with IIS, for example) and make this service a keeper of your singleton. You'll have to change your forms application to call separate service, as it holds the state now, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
I added some code for what I have now, which looks eerily like yours –  Martijn Jul 26 '12 at 14:45
    
@Martijn, then WCF won't create second instance of your singleton (you forgot static's, by the way), but it will create instace(s) of your service class. –  Dmitriy Jul 26 '12 at 14:49
    
I forgot the statics here, just fixed them. I'm going to run my example code, i'll let you know what happens. Thanks for looking in to it! –  Martijn Jul 26 '12 at 14:51
    
In your particular example InitedAt will be set to the first singleton access time, because w/out static constructor present static fields will be initialized lazily. –  Dmitriy Jul 26 '12 at 14:52
    
I completed the code and have it running. (I can quickly put the whole solution tree on the web if you want so you can verify). The WCF call shows a different time than the label on the form shows –  Martijn Jul 26 '12 at 15:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem here was that WCF Service Host was hosting the service, rather than the application itself. This caused the application to run in a seperate ApplicationDomain, which in turn caused a new singleton to be created. Switching to self-hosting solved the problem.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.