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I am trying to do some GPGPU using OpenGL ES 2.0.
It seems to me that the GL_NV_draw_buffers and the GL_OES_texture_float extensions are some of the essentials here.

This question relates to the GL_OES_texture_float extension: From the desktop world I'm used to textures being in the [0..1] range when accessed in the shader if the format is fixed point (like GL_RGBA).
Consulting the respective OES extension page, it says:

" ... If the internal format of the texture is fixed-point, components are clamped to [0..1]. Otherwise, values are not modified."

Now I've heard several times on the web (for example the answer here: Do OpenGL GLSL samplers always return floats from 0.0 to 1.0?) that ES 2.0 supports access to unclamped values in the fragment shader, too. But where is this functionality specified? The extension says "otherwise, values are not modified" but since the OpenGL ES specification only knows fixed-point formats it doesn't make sense to me.

Also, as I understand it, the extension only specifies that float values can be read from client memory into a texture but does not specify how (i.e. how many bits per channel) the texture is represented in graphics memory. Is there any official spec on this?

Finally I'd like to write unclamped floating point values to an FBO color attachment in my fragment shader, preferably using 32 bits per channel. Is this possible?

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Do you see something similar to GL_OES_texture_float when you print the extensions supported by your card ? –  Fabien R Nov 25 '12 at 14:01
    
Of course. The question relates to the behaviour of the system in the presence of the GL_OES_texture_float extension. –  Rafael Spring Nov 25 '12 at 14:30
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