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I am trying to change a int variable through a structure that constant a pointer to other structure which one field is that variable. I get one warning and one error in the compilation. Anyone can explain why and how can I do his using this code?

The code is:

typedef struct
{
    struct TEEC_Session *ptr_struct;
} Context_model;

typedef struct
{   int t_S;    
} Session_model;

void Attribution(Context_model* context,Session_model* session )
{
    (*context).ptr_struct = session;  

}

void change_t_S(Context_model* context )
{
    (*(*context).ptr_struct).t_S = 5; // I Want to change t_S to 5 using only the 

context structure

} 

main()
{
Context_model context;
Session_model session;

Attribution(&context,&session);

// Now I want to change t_S using the context 
change_t_S(&context);
}
share|improve this question
2  
I retagged this as C, since that's what the syntax looked like- but if it's C++ or something else, feel free to retag it. – David B Jul 26 '12 at 14:37
    
What does the TEEC_Session structure look like? Besides that, you probably want to use ptr->element instead of (*ptr).element for readability. – matthias Jul 26 '12 at 14:47
    
Your Context_model struct contains one member that is supposed to be a TEEC_Session*, but you're assigning a Session_model* to it without a cast, which should cause a warning. As @matthias points out, a TEEC_Session may not have t_S member, which would in turn cause an error. – twalberg Jul 26 '12 at 14:59
    
What are the warning and error messages? Do you mean to have TEEC_Session actually a Session_model? – acraig5075 Jul 26 '12 at 15:32

modify the definition of Context_model as

typedef struct
{
    Session_model *ptr_struct;
} Context_model;

and move it below the definition of Session_model.

struct TEEC_Session not defined in your code.

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You are declaring your ptr_struct as having struct TEEC_Session * type, but then attempting to use it as a pointer of Session_model * type. That's an obvious type mismatch. That just doesn't make sense.

What is struct TEEC_Session? There's no other mention of TEEC_Session in your entire program. Why did you declare your ptr_struct field as a pointer to some completely random off-the-wall type struct TEEC_Session, and then completely forget about the existence of that struct TEEC_Session?

If your struct TEEC_Session type was supposed to be synonymous with Session_model type, you should have to told the compiler about that. For example, you could've declared Session_model as

typedef struct TEEC_Session
{   
   int t_S;    
} Session_model;

and everything would work as intended.

Alternatively, you can get rid of any references to TEEC_Session entirely by reordering your declarations

typedef struct
{   
  int t_S;    
} Session_model;    

typedef struct
{
  Session_model *ptr_struct;
} Context_model;

Finally, you are using C99-style comments in your code (//). C99 does not allow declaring functions without explicit return type. main() should be int main().

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I show the code with additional declaration and the pointer dereferencing idiom.

This compiles ok in C, HTH.

struct TEEC_Session;

typedef struct
{ struct TEEC_Session *ptr_struct;
} Context_model;

typedef struct TEEC_Session
{ int t_S;
} Session_model;

void Attribution(Context_model* context,Session_model* session )
{
    context->ptr_struct = session;
}

void change_t_S(Context_model* context )
{
    context->ptr_struct->t_S = 5; // I Want to change t_S to 5 using only the context structure
}

int main_change_var(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Context_model context;
    Session_model session;

    Attribution(&context,&session);

    // Now I want to change t_S using the context
    change_t_S(&context);

    return 0;
}
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