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Is there any possibility to propagate transactions between different SOA services which are from different platforms like .NET or Java?

I know the transaction can flow in and out between WCF services which is coming from .NET. But I am not familiar with Java platform.

Now I am working in a project which communicates the services from different platform.

How can I maintain consistency in business?

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Thank you guys for helping me edit this question. –  malai.kuangren Jul 26 '12 at 14:44
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All i could find was this: jnbridge.com/jnbpro.htm –  fatman Jul 26 '12 at 15:21
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your client and server SOA infrastructure (and by extension, the underlying back-end systems being accessed in the various service implementations) supports WS-Transaction, then this would allow for transaction propagation. However, I work in a huge financial services SOA middleware environment and we choose to manage transactions ourselves: using manual compensation. While more complex, it does afford us flexibility and performance increases not relying on any distributed transaction coordinator.

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In my personally opinion, using Compensation coding manually . Sometimes It is not enough reliable for consistency. But actually We do design in this way. thanks –  malai.kuangren Jul 28 '12 at 3:13
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Transactions between services are bad for your SOA as they introduce a lot of coupling between services. Service boundary is a trust boundary. You are better off using Sagas and compensations as Daniel noted

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Great . Thanks .I need time to read it . It is a litter hard for my understanding. –  malai.kuangren Aug 2 '12 at 15:44
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Try this pattern: http://www.atomikos.com/Publications/TryCancelConfirm

It is related to the saga and compensation approaches and combines the best of all worlds.

Best

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