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Working on a project with git, I have two feature branches, call them dev-a and dev-b, branched from my develop branch (which is branched from master).

I worked on dev-a for a bit, finished it, and merged it back into develop, did a little work on develop, and started on dev-b, worked for a bit, then found something that should have been done on dev-a, so I checkout dev-a, and fix it. My DAG now looks like this:

commit hashes are obviously made up and not real hashes; they're just for reference

*   008 - (dev-a) Fix problem on dev-a
|
| * 007 - (dev-b) Work on dev-b
| * 006 - Work on dev-b
| |
| * 005 - (develop) Work on develop
| * 004 - Work on develop
| * 003 - Merged dev-a
|/|
* | 002 - Work on dev-a
* | 001 - Work on dev-a
 \|
  * 000 - Work on develop
  |

What I want to do, though, is have that commit happen "before" the merge, so that I can rebase develop and dev-b on top of it, keeping everything neat and tidy:

  * 007 - (dev-b) Work on dev-b
  * 006 - Work on dev-b
  |
  * 005 - (develop) Work on develop
  * 004 - Work on develop
  * 003 - Merged dev-a
 /|
* | 008 - (dev-a) Fix problem on dev-a
* | 002 - Work on dev-a
* | 001 - Work on dev-a
 \|
  * 000 - Work on develop
  |

It's also important to note that the fix for dev-a won't conflict with any later commits - it's a fairly small change to a single file. All of the relevant commits are local and haven't been shared.

I'm fairly certain I can do this, as git is fairly flexible, but I don't know for sure if it's possible, how to do it, or whether it's a good idea.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is all very straightforward, just do the merge again and rebase everything against it.

# make a branch of the 'develop' right before the merge
git checkout -b new-base 000 
# merge again
git merge dev-a

git checkout develop
# it moves all 'develop' commits made after the merge onto the new base.
git rebase new-base

git checkout dev-b
# moves all 'dev-b' commits onto the rebased 'develop'.
git rebase develop

# drop it, I don't think it has any value now.
git branch -d new-base
share|improve this answer
    
But when I rebase new-base, what happens with that merge commit (003)? Wouldn't I have two merge commits, then? One from merging dev-a from commit 008 and one from merging dev-a from commit 002? –  Austin Hyde Jul 26 '12 at 15:39
    
Alright, this works, with one exception, git merge dev-a needs to be git merge --no-ff dev-a otherwise it (at least in my case) does a fast-forward, turning it into linear history. –  Austin Hyde Jul 26 '12 at 18:32
    
@AustinHyde Yes, the git is wise enough to figure out that the merge is done in the new-base, so it will throw out your first merge during rebase. –  kan Jul 26 '12 at 20:28

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