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I'm using int[] arrays as a reference. I wondering if my use of case statements is sound or if it will cause errors down the line.

This is my code:

    int switcheroo = intarray[0];
    int foo = intarray[1];
    boolean size = false; 
    boolean biggersize = false;

    switch (switcheroo) {

    case 0:
        switch (foo) {
        case 1:
            doSomething(switcheroo); //change switcheroo somehow.
            break;
        case 2: 
            doSomethingElse(switcheroo); //change switcheroo differently.
            break;
        }
    case 1:
        size = true;
        break;
    case 2: 
        biggersize = true;
        break;
    default:
        break;
    }

Unless it's a coincidence, this is working to ripple the changes from the nested case statement into the other cases, as I want.

My questions are:

Will this nesting causes trouble further down the line?

Is the lack of a break; after a case bad practice?

Thanks.

Edit: The methods which change switcheroo in the middle of the switch statements were put there for responses to that. I will not be doing this is my program.

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1  
It's widely considered a bad practice, yes. break is basically a goto, and makes the control flow hard to follow. –  millimoose Jul 26 '12 at 15:05
2  
doSomething(switcheroo); //change switcheroo somehow. => you can't change switcheroo in that method. and changing the switched variable's value in the middle of the switch does not look like a good idea. –  assylias Jul 26 '12 at 15:06
3  
@millimoose Not using break for all case statements is sometimes considered a bad practice, but in no way is "using break" a bad practice because it's a goto." break` and continue were determined to be the only -legitimate- uses of goto, which is why they exist in the language. –  corsiKa Jul 26 '12 at 15:07
1  
@SeanKenny Nope, I'd have stated that outright. –  millimoose Jul 26 '12 at 15:10
1  
No : break is not a goto mind. It just leaves the nested code. Break in switch IS NEEDED to stop the switch parsing. –  cl-r Jul 26 '12 at 15:10

8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Nesting won't cause trouble down the line exactly, but it can be confusing to read. Adding comments and/or other documentation will really help future coders (and yourself in a week!) understand this by looking at it.

The lack of a break isn't a bad practice by itself, but it is something that -most- case statements have, so I would add a comment at the end like // no break, allow fall-through.

So both cases boil down to good documentation.

These points are perpendicular to the fact that I don't think this code does what you think it will do.

The case clause is not reevalauted every time you come across one - they're just points to jump to for the switch. So in your example, you will always end up in case 1 if you start at case 0 - you'll never end up at case 2 from case 0.

If I were to restructure this, here's what I would do. Instead of using int, I would use enum:

enum Foo { GOOD_FOO, BAD_FOO }
enum Switcharoo { BAR, BAZ, BAQ, ESCAPE }
enum Size { NONE, REGULAR, BIGGER }

Foo foo = ... // assigned somewhere
Switcharoo roo = ... // assigned somewhere
Size size = NONE;

// use a while loop to reevalulate roo with each pass
while(roo != Switcharoo.ESCAPE) {
    switch(roo){
        case BAR:
                switch(foo) {
                    case GOOD_FOO: foo = doSomething(foo); break;
                    case BAD_FOO: foo = doSomethingElse(foo); break;
                }
            break;
        case BAZ:
            roo = Switcharoo.ESCAPE;
            size = Size.REGULAR;
            break;
        case BAQ:
            roo = Switcharoo.ESCAPE;
            size = Size.BIGGER;
            break;

    }
}
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3  
+1 - "you'll never end up at case 2 from case 0" which seems to induce the conclusion: every time you make things more complicated than they should be, there's a bug around the corner ;-) –  assylias Jul 26 '12 at 15:11
    
@corsiKa If I added a default case into the nested switch, this was omitted inadvertantly, could case 2 in the outer switch ever be triggered? –  user1486147 Jul 26 '12 at 15:21
2  
@Sean nope. Case 0 will always fall through to case 1, no matter what. Think of the actual statements as a large page, and the case 0 statements as sticky notes. When you do the switch, you go to the sticky note, and keep going until you hit a break. Adding a break to the internal switch will just exit that switch, and you'll again be at the end of case 0, and will move on to case 1. –  corsiKa Jul 26 '12 at 15:26
    
@corsiKa Thanks. Your method works better (obviously). –  user1486147 Jul 26 '12 at 15:31

RE: Is the lack of a break; after a case bad practice?

If you don't include a break after each case statement the flow will continue trough the next statements, so the code for more than one option will be executed.

From the Java Tutorial:

Another point of interest is the break statement. Each break statement terminates the enclosing switch statement. Control flow continues with the first statement following the switch block. The break statements are necessary because without them, statements in switch blocks fall through: All statements after the matching case label are executed in sequence, regardless of the expression of subsequent case labels, until a break statement is encountered.

Check http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/switch.html to learn more details about switch statements.

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Does this mean that if case 0 is triggered in the outer statement, that case 1 will always follow regardless of the value of switcheroo after the nested switch statement? –  user1486147 Jul 26 '12 at 15:11
1  
It does, @SeanKenny, case 0 will always lead to case 1 also being executed. And case 2 (the outer) is never reached from case 0 or case 1. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 26 '12 at 15:13
    
@DanielFischer Thanks. –  user1486147 Jul 26 '12 at 15:14
    
Yes, the case 1 of the outer switch will be executed. It will continue setting size=true and the will exit the outer case because of the break. The inner switch will execute only case 1 or 2 depending of the value of foo. –  JuanZe Jul 26 '12 at 15:17
    
Try to simplify your code using double dispatching. In 15+ years of Java programming I never used a switch inside a switch... –  JuanZe Jul 26 '12 at 15:18

In case foo is neither 1 nor 2, is switcheroo supposed to continue to case 1? If yes, your code is correct. If not, you need to add a break before case 1

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switch operator is a kind of conditional if operator. And a bunch of if operators may report that you need to involve object polymorphism in your code instead of making sequental if-switch operators.

Consider re-arranging your data to classes/objects and process them using polymorphism approach. It will make your code more reliable, more manageable and just more beautiful.

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Im not sure if i understood your first question, can you give me some more information (concrete maybe)?

Concerning the second question, there's nothing wrong about not having a break statement after a case, as long as you know that the code will continue to execute till it finds a break statement.

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well..It seems the only thing you lack here is readability. Do this type of nesting only if you are forces to do.

Is the lack of a break; after a case bad practice?

not bad rather it is a good practice to avoid unsual behaviour. Your code will continue executing to your last case in absensce of this Break.

Add break in your first outer case too.

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I'd recommend avoiding nesting and fall-through in combination. At least personally, I tend to expect that every case ends with a break, so I'd use fallthrough only in cases where it's very easy to spot, and leads to clearer code than an if..else, such as:

switch (foo) {
    case 0:
    case 1:
        doSomething();
        break;

    case 2:
        doSomethingElse();
        break;

    default:
        break;
}

That is, with either empty or very simple (one statement) case bodies. In your case, refactoring the body of the first case into a method would probably work:

void changeSwitcheroo(int foo, int switcheroo) {
    switch (foo) {
        case 1:
            doSomething(switcheroo); //change switcheroo somehow.
            break;
        case 2: 
            doSomethingElse(switcheroo); //change switcheroo differently.
            break;
    }
}

// ...

int switcheroo = intarray[0];
int foo = intarray[1];

switch (switcheroo) {
    case 0:
        changeSwitcheroo(foo, switcheroo);
    case 1:
        size = true;
        break;
    case 2: 
        biggersize = true;
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

(This is mostly arguing readability and style. The meaning of the switch will still be "if switcheroo is 1, jump into the middle of case 0.)

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I think default doesn't need break;) –  Nandkumar Tekale Jul 26 '12 at 15:27
    
@Nandkumar It probably doesn't, but my flavour of coder OCD trends towards having it there. –  millimoose Jul 26 '12 at 15:52

If there are only 2 alternatives, prefer an if/else. Fewer lines of code and no break issues.

Will this nesting causes trouble further down the line?

A problem is that such switch nesting is hard to read: I had to look at the code twice before I noticed that you were using a nested switch. This can be a maintenance issue, but that isn't a reason not to use a nested switch, just use this sparingly, adjust your indentation to clarify what's going on, and comment on the usage.

Is the lack of a break; after a case bad practice?

Falling through by omitting the break can also lead to maintenance/debugging issues, but I don't consider it bad practice. It is, after all, intrinsic in the design of the switch statement. A fall through comment is always welcome so that the next guy - or you, revisiting your code months later - knows that the fall-through is intentional.

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