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I've had some exposure to MVC, though I'm still figuring out a lot of the details. I've written a few small personal projects to learn from, though one thing I'm still not quite sure how to do is handle the logic between the three gracefully to determine what View I should be loading.

For an example, imagine a basic user registration system. Each user needs to have a username, password, and some other details to identify them. I would code the Model something like this:

namespace Model;

class NewUser extends Model
{
    public $username;
    public $password;
    public $other_details;

    public function __construct(array $data)
    {
        if ($this -> CheckData($data))
        {
            // Add data to some database table.
            $this -> InsertData($data);
        }
    }

    private function CheckData(array $data)
    {
        if (!isset($data['username']) || empty($data['username']))
        {
            return FALSE;
        }

        // !isset() and empty() checks on other required information.

        if (strlen($data['password']) < 8)
        {
            return FALSE;
        }

        // Make sure data meets other requirements, return FALSE if not.

        return TRUE;
    }
}

So that's pretty straightforward. NewUser::CheckData() makes sure the incoming data conforms to the requirements of a new user. All info must be non-empty, password at least eight characters, etc. If the requirements aren't met, it fails and the data isn't added. If they are met, the new user is added to the system.

The Controller handles the HTTP request made by the client, requests the appropriate data and then "gives" the client the HTTP response, so I would code the Controller something like this:

namespace Controller;

class NewUser extends Controller
{
    public $new_user;

    public function __construct()
    {
        if (isset($_POST) && !empty($_POST['username']))
        {
            $this -> new_user = new \Model\NewUser($_POST);

            // How should I handle what View to load in this case?
        }

        else
        {
            $this -> DefaultView();
        }
    }

    private function DefaultView()
    {
        $this -> LoadView('header.php');
        $this -> LoadView('signup.php');
        $this -> LoadView('footer.php');
    }

    private function MissingDataView()
    {
        $this -> LoadView('header.php');
        $this -> LoadView('missing-data.php');
        $this -> LoadView('footer.php');
    }

    private function PasswordTooShortView()
    {
        $this -> LoadView('header.php');
        $this -> LoadView('password-too-short.php');
        $this -> LoadView('footer.php');
    }
}

Again, pretty straightforward. If $_POST isn't set, then DefaultView() is called. As noted by the comment, I'm confused on how I should determine what View to load in the case where $_POST is set. In the past I've had an extra variable $error to my Model and then I'd check what that was set to in the Controller and call the appropriate method based on its value. That seems like a terrible way of handling this, so I'd appreciate it if anyone can point me in the correct direction.

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1 Answer 1

You would normally have one view for the register action that displays the form, and any errors. Upon submission, your controller would insert the user into the database if all the required data was valid and do whatever logic you needed, whether it's redirecting to say, a confirmation page.

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