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I'm new to Stackoverflow and pretty new to bash-scripting as well, so please forgive me for asking such a dork question. I've really browsed trough a lot of answers in here but nothing seems to work for me.

I'm trying to make this little script to check wordpress.org for the latest version, and check if I already have that file on the same directory as where the script is:

#!/bin/bash

function getVersion {
new=$(curl --head http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz | grep Content-Disposition | cut -d '=' -f 2)
echo "$new"
}

function checkIfAlreadyExists {
    if [ -e $new ]; then
        echo "File $new does already exist!"
    else
        echo "There is no file named $new in this folder!"
    fi
}

getVersion
checkIfAlreadyExists

It kind of works as the output is:

jkw@xubuntu32-vb:~/bin$ ./wordpress_check 
  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0
wordpress-3.4.1.tar.gz
 in this folder! named wordpress-3.4.1.tar.gz
jkw@xubuntu32-vb:~/bin$ 

So I get the right filename with curl&grep&cut but there is something wrong with the variable. When I print it in line 5 it seems allright, but when printed in line 12 it comes out looking funny. Also, the if statement does not work, I do have the file in the same directory.

If I output the result of curl --head http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz | grep Content-Disposition | cut -d '=' -f 2 in a textfile, I seem to get a new line in the end, could this be the problem? If I pipe the command to xdd it looks like this:

  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0
0000000: 776f 7264 7072 6573 732d 332e 342e 312e  wordpress-3.4.1.
0000010: 7461 722e 677a 0d0a                      tar.gz..

..and I can't make any sense of it.

I have tried to pipe the command trough tr '\n' '\0' or tr -d '\n' as suggested in a lot of similiar questions here, but it seems to do nothing. Any ideas?

PS: I'm also wondering where do the lines..

  % Total    % Received % Xferd  Average Speed   Time    Time     Time  Current
                                 Dload  Upload   Total   Spent    Left  Speed
  0     0    0     0    0     0      0      0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:--     0

..come to my shell output. When I run just the command curl --head http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz in terminal, the output does not have any lines like this.

share|improve this question
2  
Your new variable ends with the "\r\n" line-ending that HTTP sends. You'll need to strip that, but I'm not sure how to do that in bash. –  chepner Jul 26 '12 at 15:52
    
Thank you @chepner - I just changed line 4 to: new=$(curl --head http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz | grep Content-Disposition | cut -d '=' -f 2 | tr -d '\r\n') and it works like a charm! –  Janne Warén Jul 26 '12 at 16:00
    
+1 for well formatted question,clear problem description, sample output, prior research, darn I wish I could do +4! Welcome and keep posting. –  shellter Jul 26 '12 at 19:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a working version of your code with the changes commented as to why they were made.

#!/bin/bash

function latest_file_name {
    local url="http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz"

    curl -s --head $url | # Add -s to remove progress information
    # This is the proper place to remove the carridge return.
    # There is a program called dos2unix that can be used as well.
    tr -d '\r'          | #dos2unix
    # You can combine the grep and cut as follows
    awk -F '=' '/^Content-Disposition/ {print $2}'
}


function main {
    local file_name=$(latest_file_name)

    # [[ uses bash builtin test functionality and is faster.
    if [[ -e "$file_name" ]]; then
        echo "File $file_name does already exist!"
    else
        echo "There is no file named $file_name in this folder!"
    fi
}

main
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, accepted. Seems to work fine and it's very useful to learn awk and overall better coding practises like this. Great! –  Janne Warén Jul 27 '12 at 19:53

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