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Is there a way to convert an enum to a list that contains all the enum's options?

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marked as duplicate by 0x2bad 0xdeadbeef, Gian, Roman C, Abizern, Klas Mellbourn Jun 16 '13 at 9:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
    
The ins and outs of C# enums describes how to do this (same answer as below) as well as a bunch of other common enum operations. –  ChaseMedallion Jul 20 at 20:05

15 Answers 15

up vote 393 down vote accepted

This will return an IEnumerable<SomeEnum> of all the values of an Enum.

Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)).Cast<SomeEnum>();

If you want that to be a List<SomeEnum>, just add .ToList() after .Cast<SomeEnum>().

To use the Cast function on an Array you need to have the System.Linq in your using section.

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2  
Actually the result of Cast<T>() is an IEnumerable<T> so if you want an array you would have to change your line to: var array = Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)).Cast<SomeEnum>().ToArray(); –  Jake Pearson Aug 13 '10 at 14:14
27  
that's superfluous, and will mean extra copying. Enum.GetValues returns an array already, so you just have to do var values = (SomeEnum[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)) –  thecoop Nov 9 '10 at 2:33
1  
if you wanna just values then do the cast again : Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)).Cast<SomeEnum>().Cast<int>().ToList() –  Wahid Bitar Jun 14 '11 at 14:18
2  
if its an enum of int values... Enum.GetValues(typeof(EnumType)).Cast<int>().ToArray(); –  JGilmartin Feb 29 '12 at 13:02
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To get the list of names you use the GetNames method of the Enum object the same way as you do for the GetValues. It will return an array of strings containing the names of each element in the Enum. –  David Parvin Aug 19 '13 at 21:05

Much easier way:

Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum))
    .Cast<SomeEnum>()
    .Select(v => v.ToString())
    .ToList();
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8  
Why the ToList() between Cast and Select? And how is that much easier than the accepted answer? It's identical to it, except you convert to string in the end. –  CodesInChaos Dec 5 '10 at 11:44
1  
Just compare the amount of code for this very simple operation. Besides this is more a .NETy solution to this problem. Agree on the ToList(). –  Gili Dec 8 '10 at 12:29
List <SomeEnum> theList = Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)).Cast<SomeEnum>().ToList();
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This allocates two collections to hold the values and discards one of those collections. See my recent answer. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 6 '13 at 19:44
    
Thanks for providing an alternative that was never answered before. –  nawfal Jun 8 '13 at 21:15

The short answer is, use:

(SomeEnum[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum))

If you need that for a local variable, it's var allSomeEnumValues = (SomeEnum[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum));.

Why is the syntax like this?!

The static method GetValues was introduced back in the old .NET 1.0 days. It returns a one-dimensional array of runtime type SomeEnum[]. But since it's a non-generic method (generics was not introduced until .NET 2.0), it can't declare its return type (compile-time return type) as such.

.NET arrays do have a kind of covariance, but because SomeEnum will be a value type, and because array type covariance does not work with value types, they couldn't even declare the return type as an object[] or Enum[]. (This is different from e.g. this overload of GetCustomAttributes from .NET 1.0 which has compile-time return type object[] but actually returns an array of type SomeAttribute[] where SomeAttribute is necessarily a reference type.)

Because of this, the .NET 1.0 method had to declare its return type as System.Array. But I guarantee you it is a SomeEnum[].

Everytime you call GetValues again with the same enum type, it will have to allocate a new array and copy the values into the new array. That's because arrays might be written to (modified) by the "consumer" of the method, so they have to make a new array to be sure the values are unchanged. .NET 1.0 didn't have good read-only collections.

If you need the list of all values many different places, consider calling GetValues just once and cache the result in read-only wrapper, for example like this:

public static readonly ReadOnlyCollection<SomeEnum> AllSomeEnumValues
    = Array.AsReadOnly((SomeEnum[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)));

Then you can use AllSomeEnumValues many times, and the same collection can be safely reused.

Why is it bad to use .Cast<SomeEnum>()?

A lot of other answers use .Cast<SomeEnum>(). The problem with this is that it uses the non-generic IEnumerable implementation of the Array class. This should have involved boxing each of the values into an System.Object box, and then using the Cast<> method to unbox all those values again. Luckily the .Cast<> method seems to check the runtime type of its IEnumerable parameter (the this parameter) before it starts iterating through the collection, so it isn't that bad after all. It turns out .Cast<> lets the same array instance through.

If you follow it by .ToArray() or .ToList(), as in:

Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)).Cast<SomeEnum>().ToList() // DON'T do this

you have another problem: You create a new collection (array) when you call GetValues and then create yet a new collection (List<>) with the .ToList() call. So that's one (extra) redundant allocation of an entire collection to hold the values.

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1  
I ended up here looking for a way to get a List<> from my enum, not an Array. If you only want to loop through your enum this is great, but the .Cast<type>().ToList() provides you with an IEnumerable collection, which is valuable in some situations. –  DaveD Mar 10 at 20:44
    
@DaveD The expression (SomeEnum[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(SomeEnum)) is also IEnumerable and IEnumerable<SomeEnum>, and it is IList and IList<SomeEnum> as well. But if you need to add or remove entries later, so that the length of the list changes, you can copy to a List<SomeEnum>, but that is not the most usual need. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Mar 10 at 21:13

Here is the way I love, using LINQ:

public class EnumModel
{
    public int Value { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public enum MyEnum
{
    Name1=1,
    Name2=2,
    Name3=3
}

public class Test
{
    List<EnumModel> enums = ((IEnumerable<EnumModel>)Enum.GetValues(typeof(MyEnum))).Select(c => new EnumModel() { Value = (int)c, Name = c.ToString() }).ToList();
}

Hope it helps

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1  
((IEnumerable<EnumModel>)Enum.GetValues should be ((IEnumerable<MyEnum>)Enum.GetValues –  Steven Anderson Jun 20 at 5:20

I've always used to get a list of enum values like this:

Array list = Enum.GetValues(typeof (SomeEnum));
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1  
This will give you an Array, not List<>. –  Shenaniganz Jan 10 '13 at 20:59

Here for usefulness... some code for getting the values into a list, which converts the enum into readable form for the text

public class KeyValuePair
  {
    public string Key { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    public int Value { get; set; }

    public static List<KeyValuePair> ListFrom<T>()
    {
      var array = (T[])(Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Cast<T>());
      return array
        .Select(a => new KeyValuePair
          {
            Key = a.ToString(),
            Name = a.ToString().SplitCapitalizedWords(),
            Value = Convert.ToInt32(a)
          })
          .OrderBy(kvp => kvp.Name)
         .ToList();
    }
  }

.. and the supporting System.String extension method:

/// <summary>
/// Split a string on each occurrence of a capital (assumed to be a word)
/// e.g. MyBigToe returns "My Big Toe"
/// </summary>
public static string SplitCapitalizedWords(this string source)
{
  if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(source)) return String.Empty;
  var newText = new StringBuilder(source.Length * 2);
  newText.Append(source[0]);
  for (int i = 1; i < source.Length; i++)
  {
    if (char.IsUpper(source[i]))
      newText.Append(' ');
    newText.Append(source[i]);
  }
  return newText.ToString();
}
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When you say (T[])(Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Cast<T>()), looking carefully at the parentheses, we see that you actually cast the return value of Cast<T> to a T[]. That's quite confusing (and maybe surprising it will even work). Skip the Cast<T> call. See my new answer for details. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 6 '13 at 19:47

I think that if you are looking to do this, you might want to think if you really should be using an enum or if you should switch to an object that represents w/e your enum is.

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very simple answer

Here is a property I use in one of my applications

    public List<string> OperationModes
    {
        get
        {
            return Enum.GetNames(typeof(SomeENUM)).ToList();
        }
    }
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public class NameValue
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public object Value { get; set; }
}


    public static List<NameValue> EnumToList<T>()
    {
        var array = (T[])(Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Cast<T>()); 
        var array2 = Enum.GetNames(typeof(T)).ToArray<string>(); 
        List<NameValue> lst = null;
        for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
        {
            if (lst == null)
                lst = new List<NameValue>();
            string name = array2[i];
            T value = array[i];
            lst.Add(new NameValue { Name = name, Value = value });
        }
        return lst;
    }

Convert Enum To a list more on
Convert Enum To a list

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Casting to T[] the return value of Cast<T> is unnecessarily confusing. See my recent answer. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 6 '13 at 19:49
/// <summary>
/// Method return a read-only collection of the names of the constants in specified enum
/// </summary>
/// <returns></returns>
public static ReadOnlyCollection<string> GetNames()
{
    return Enum.GetNames(typeof(T)).Cast<string>().ToList().AsReadOnly();   
}

where T is a type of Enumeration; Add this:

using System.Collections.ObjectModel; 
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Language[] result = (Language[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(Language))
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Already taken.. –  nawfal Jun 15 '13 at 12:38

You could use the following generic method:

    public static List<T> GetItemsList<T>(this int enums) where T : struct, IConvertible
    {
        if (!typeof (T).IsEnum)
        {
            throw new Exception("Type given must be an Enum");
        }

        return (from int item in Enum.GetValues(typeof (T))
                where (enums & item) == item
                select (T) Enum.Parse(typeof (T), item.ToString(new CultureInfo("en")))).ToList();
    }
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You first get the values, then cast each to int, then calls ToString with a weird culture on that int, then parses the string back to type T? Downvoted. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 6 '13 at 19:54
    
Yes cast all values to int for check, does enums contains item, when cast to string to parse enum back. This method more useful with BitMask. CultureInfo not reqired. –  Vitall May 7 '13 at 4:21

If you want Enum int as key and name as value, good if you storing the number to database and it is from Enum!

void Main()
{
     ICollection<EnumValueDto> list = EnumValueDto.ConvertEnumToList<SearchDataType>();

     foreach (var element in list)
     {
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Key: {0}; Value: {1}", element.Key, element.Value));
     }

     /* OUTPUT:
        Key: 1; Value: Boolean
        Key: 2; Value: DateTime
        Key: 3; Value: Numeric         
     */
}

public class EnumValueDto
{
    public int Key { get; set; }

    public string Value { get; set; }

    public static ICollection<EnumValueDto> ConvertEnumToList<T>() where T : struct, IConvertible
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsEnum)
        {
            throw new Exception("Type given T must be an Enum");
        }

        var result = Enum.GetValues(typeof(T))
                         .Cast<T>()
                         .Select(x =>  new EnumValueDto { Key = Convert.ToInt32(x), 
                                       Value = x.ToString(new CultureInfo("en")) })
                         .ToList()
                         .AsReadOnly();

        return result;
    }
}

public enum SearchDataType
{
    Boolean = 1,
    DateTime,
    Numeric
}
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private List<SimpleLogType> GetLogType()
{
  List<SimpleLogType> logList = new List<SimpleLogType>();
  SimpleLogType internalLogType;
  foreach (var logtype in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Log)))
  {
    internalLogType = new SimpleLogType();
    internalLogType.Id = (int) (Log) Enum.Parse(typeof (Log), logtype.ToString(), true);
    internalLogType.Name = (Log)Enum.Parse(typeof(Log), logtype.ToString(), true);
    logList.Add(internalLogType);
  }
  return logList;
}

in top Code , Log is a Enum and SimpleLogType is a structure for logs .

public enum Log
{
  None = 0,
  Info = 1,
  Warning = 8,
  Error = 3
}
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Your foreach variable has compile-time type object (written as var), but it really is a Log value (runtime type). There's no need to call ToString and then Enum.Parse. Start your foreach with this instead: foreach (var logtype in (Log[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(Log))) { ... } –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 6 '13 at 20:01